CPU temps

I just got an Alienware 17 R5. It's got an i7 8750H and an Nvidia 1070. While the GPU only hits temps around mid 70s under load, the CPU stays consistently in the mid to high 80s. My hardware monitor software shows that under load, the CPU even reached a Max of 100C, which is the "safe" operational temp of the CPU according to Intel. I've seen people repasting their chips, but I reallllllly don't want to do that to a 2k+ laptop that I JUST bought.. do you guys think these temps I'm seeing are cause for concern enough for me to repaste these chips? Or should I just run with it?
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3 Replies
Hurricane86
Bronze

Re: CPU temps

The Chip itself will operate safely at those temperatures, more or less indefinitely; but the system will throttle back performance in order to balance the heat generation. Technically, it is not the running at 90C that would cause "wear" to the system but rather frequent cycles between hot and cool. Unless you are running high-loads then power cycling the machine every few minutes, I wouldn't worry too much about it. 

That said, the thermal properties of the interface materials used by Dell have universally been considered by the community to be roughly equivalent to toothpaste for quite some time. A re-paste could provide more peace of mind, by dropping your temps down to the 80's at load and maybe even provide more stable performance; but having done this, it is not for the feint of heart.

Instead, it might be a better first step to see if you can get away with a mild power usage tweak in windows. Use the intel Extreme Tuning Utility and try to set a mild undervolt setting and see if you get better temps under load.  You can also lower the windows performance settings directly under power options, in the advanced battery options. Drop the power down to like 95% while plugged in and see if this helps. 

Ralstain
Copper

Re: CPU temps

I also noticed I was hitting the 100c mark on the cpu and noticed it was throttling back a little under load to compensate. I decided to repaste with cooler master thermal master gel. Couldn’t be happier. Ran the CPU on a full load and never got over 93c; GPU also took a 7-9c decrease. If your worried, it may be worth the time to do a repaste. I also added arctic diamond paste on both sides of the thermal pads, where they are placed, to get better interface in places where there where barely any indentions on the pads. I stay within 10-15 of TJmax now. 

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Buzz635
Bronze

Re: CPU temps


@Hurricane86 wrote:

The Chip itself will operate safely at those temperatures, more or less indefinitely; but the system will throttle back performance in order to balance the heat generation. Technically, it is not the running at 90C that would cause "wear" to the system but rather frequent cycles between hot and cool. Unless you are running high-loads then power cycling the machine every few minutes, I wouldn't worry too much about it. 

That said, the thermal properties of the interface materials used by Dell have universally been considered by the community to be roughly equivalent to toothpaste for quite some time. A re-paste could provide more peace of mind, by dropping your temps down to the 80's at load and maybe even provide more stable performance; but having done this, it is not for the feint of heart.

Instead, it might be a better first step to see if you can get away with a mild power usage tweak in windows. Use the intel Extreme Tuning Utility and try to set a mild undervolt setting and see if you get better temps under load.  You can also lower the windows performance settings directly under power options, in the advanced battery options. Drop the power down to like 95% while plugged in and see if this helps. 


+1 on trying to undervolt first. I recently bought a dell G5 15 laptop with the same processor and a 1060 max q GPU. I had a similar problem where under heavy load the cpu would shoot up in power consumption and then start power throttling and sometimes thermal throttling. 100 degrees is the max that chip can be at without damaging itself, but there should be safeguards including and up to an emergency shutdown to prevent severe damage. And cpu temps in the high 80s are a bit high in my opinion as well. I downloaded intel extreme tuning utility (xtu) and dropped the core and cache voltage steadily and ran stress tests to make sure it was still stable. Now I am running a -.125 core and cache under volt with no thermal throttling at all and no power throttling except under some synthetic benchmarks. I have never had to re-paste a processor but have heard it can yield good results depending on the age and quality of the original thermal paste. So try undervolting first and if the issue persists then consider re-pasting.

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