kb1qzh
1 Copper

Migrating to m.2 NVMe

Hey All,

I'm trying to migrate my Alienware 15 R2's spinning disk to 500GB Samsung 960 Evo.

I used Acronis True Image because it auto resize everything to fit.

The transfer went without issue. Pulled out the original hard drive and booted off the Samsung. It would get to login and then BSOD.

I tried using the factory image recovery which did wipe and install but Windows would complete.

 

What's the right way to migrate to a m.2 NVMe drive?

 

Thanks

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20 Replies
jphughan
5 Rhenium

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe

The issue is that Windows when installed on a SATA device isn't set up to start its native NVMe class driver, so when you migrate it over, it doesn't run properly.  Since you're using a Samsung SSD, one option would be to install Samsung's own NVMe driver before starting the clone, since that will set Windows up to use it.  The other option (and possibly the only option if you didn't have an SSD from a vendor that provided their own NVMe driver) would be to use a different cloning tool that supports tweaking a cloned Windows installation in order to boot properly on dissimilar hardware.  Macrium Reflect has a feature called ReDeploy for this purpose, and actually it JUST got an update to allow ReDeploy to activate that native NVMe class driver in this scenario.  ReDeploy however is only included in the paid versions of Reflect, although it's a great tool for general purpose image backups going forward and I would argue it's well worth the cost.  But again, you should be able to use the first method if all you need is a clone operation.  If it still doesn't work, try Macrium Reflect Free to perform the clone, because someone in the Macrium forums just recently made a thread saying they successfully used the Samsung NVMe driver method I described in order to perform the clone you're attempting with Reflect, and using that driver allowed the clone to succeed even without ReDeploy.

avtella
2 Iron

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe

One problem I can see is that if the Bios is set to Raid On and then you switch to AHCI it will cause a BSOD. You can change to AHCI without reinstalling by following the instructions below:
https://triplescomputers.com/blog/uncategorized/solution-switch-windows-10-from-raidide-to-ahci-oper...

Then after that clone the drive as nVME requires the drive to be in AHCI mode not Raid On.
____________________________________________________
[Inspiron 7577] | Windows 10 Home | 4K IPS Display | Intel Core I7 7700HQ | nVidia GTX1060 | 2.4 Ghz DDR4 RAM - 2x16GB | Samsung 960 Pro SSD - 512GB | Crucial MX100 SSD - 256 GB |
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jphughan
5 Rhenium

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe

NVMe does NOT require the BIOS to be set to AHCI.  Several systems run NVMe in RAID mode just fine, in fact that's the only supported way to run Windows 7 on an NVMe SSD.  AHCI mode is sometimes required if you want to use certain manufacturer utilities like Samsung Magician, but that's about it.  Otherwise, if the system is already in RAID mode, that actually makes a SATA to NVMe clone much EASIER rather than creating a complication.

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avtella
2 Iron

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe

You are right it shouldn't matter but I have run into quirks with some systems. The Samsung 960 Pro refused to even boot with Raid On when I was trying to do a fresh install on my 7567. When Dell replaced my 7567 with the 7577 it was sent with AHCI default (It came with an nVME drive) and  just as a test I tried Raid On for a fresh install and same issue. Granted I don't usually use RST anyway I just did that as a test as some others had similar issues.

 

Also note that the Samsung nVME driver with the newer firmwares for some people seems to be causing instability and crashes (at least on the 960 Pro), not sure if that has been addressed, therefore I would stick to the built in nvstore drivers.

____________________________________________________
[Inspiron 7577] | Windows 10 Home | 4K IPS Display | Intel Core I7 7700HQ | nVidia GTX1060 | 2.4 Ghz DDR4 RAM - 2x16GB | Samsung 960 Pro SSD - 512GB | Crucial MX100 SSD - 256 GB |
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kb1qzh
1 Copper

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe

just wanted to give a quick update.

I retried the process again (acronis clone from windows) same issue. Maybe a little worse as windows also decided to pull down updates.

After the reboot it will start to process update then BSOD with irql_not_less_or_equal

The samsung driver should be in place.

I'm going over everyone's suggestions but want get back to my initial error was well

Acronis does have boot disk for going back to dissimilar hardware like macrium. Do you think either is still needed?

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kb1qzh
1 Copper

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe

one more thing. before doing the clone a second time (so the m.2 had the factory image at this stage), i was able to get it to load the registration where previously it would fail out.

i didn't note what I did.

 

i was also thinking if i could extract the samsung driver, shouldn't i then be able to copy to the windows install with a boot disk or system repair?

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jphughan
5 Rhenium

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe

IF you can extract the Samsung NVMe driver from its installer, then yes you could probably use that, but I tried that with the v2.2 installer out of general interest and it was not simple.  The installer doesn't open up with WinRAR, and it doesn't even run unless it detects a Samsung NVMe SSD already installed, so getting it out of the system's Driver library after installation isn't possible unless you already have the SSD.  I did find the driver available from some other sites, but since I didn't really need it, I didn't feel the need to go that route, and frankly I'm not sure I would even if I did.

But if you want to preload the Samsung NVMe driver in order for the migration to work without dealing with tools intended to facilitate migrations to dissimliar hardware, it seems your system would need the Samsung NVMe driver installed and active, i.e. the system state that you clone would need to have the Samsung SSD present at the time -- but that's based on what I read from someone else who did this, not my own experience.  Someone who did this with Reflect posted a thread about their experience here: https://forum.macrium.com/Topic21731.aspx

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Tesla1856
6 Thallium

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe


@kb1qzhwrote:

 

What's the right way to migrate to a m.2 NVMe drive?

 


If I had to pick just one, I would probably pick:
- Backup data-files
- Nuke-and-Pave (wipe all and clean-install). 
It sounds hard, but remember ... You would probably be done by now. 

https://www.dell.com/community/Alienware-General/Alienware-Aurora-R6-I-wanna-install-SSD-in-it-and-d...

Your cloning trouble could be:
- You are still using Acronis and not Macrium Reflect (free version does alot)
- You are trying to do a direct clone instead of verified Image file
- Temporarily turn off SecureBoot (or some other BIOS setting mis-match). The drives use different interfaces, protocols, and drivers (see my first paragraph). 

Maybe the real answer is "The way that works".   

 


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jphughan
5 Rhenium

Re: Migrating to m.2 NVMe


@Tesla1856wrote:

@kb1qzhwrote:

 

What's the right way to migrate to a m.2 NVMe drive?

 


If I had to pick just one, I would probably pick:
- Backup data-files
- Nuke-and-Pave (wipe all and clean-install). 
It sounds hard, but remember ... You would probably be done by now. 

https://www.dell.com/community/Alienware-General/Alienware-Aurora-R6-I-wanna-install-SSD-in-it-and-d...

Your cloning trouble could be:
- You are still using Acronis and not Macrium Reflect (free version does alot)
- You are trying to do a direct clone instead of verified Image file
- Temporarily turn off SecureBoot (or some other BIOS setting mis-match). The drives use different interfaces, protocols, and drivers (see my first paragraph). 

Maybe the real answer is "The way that works".   

 


Can't argue with the logic that a clean install might have been faster under the circumstances, but:

- Although I have not used Acronis, direct clone vs verified image file should not make a practical difference to the outcome other than requiring a temporary location to store the image file and more time since you're taking an extra step.  A "verified" image file simply means that the software confirmed that the data was copied from disk to image file correctly, but if you don't use an intermediate file in the first place because you're performing a direct clone, then there's nothing to verify there, and therefore NOT having this verification does not represent a shortcoming of the clone approach.  Plus the OP may not have an external drive on which to store an image file temporarily.

- Secure Boot has absolutely no effect when it comes to hardware-level issues like SSDs, SATA vs. NVMe, etc.  It only ensures that the software bootloader that the system attempts to start has been signed by a trusted authority -- and if Secure Boot is the culprit in that scenario, you get a message from the system (not a Windows Boot Manager error or BSOD) that specifically tells you that the boot failed because the bootloader wasn't signed.

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