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Computer Won't Start, Fan on Full Blast

I have an XPS Gen III (little more than 6 years old), but besides being old I haven't had any problems with it. However, yesterday when I turned it on, after 2 seconds the only thing that happened was the fan turned on full blast after about 2s. There was no display on the monitor and no beeps from the board. Also, there was nothing significant to my knowledge that would have caused this (i.e. no power surge).

From what I have gathered, it's either the mobo, CPU, PSU or video card. I removed all the RAM, booted and nothing changed - no beeps still. I tried jumping the CMOS, no change. I have reseated most of the components and no change.

Can anyone tell me what the likely culprit is or how I can "easily" diagnose which component is failing? Thanks.

Solution (1)

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Shteve

As the power button LED is solid Amber, try the following and start the system to see it makes a difference:

Remove and then reinstall the memory modules.

Remove and then reinstall any cards.

Remove and then reinstall the graphics cards, if applicable.

No difference and if you are comfortable working around computers, you could try the following:

Note: The only 100% method of testing a PSU, is to install a know working power supply.

Unplug the cord from the power supply, hold the power button in for about 15/20 seconds, open the case, unplug the 24-pin power connector from the motherboard and jump the Green wire to one of the Black wires, reconnect the power cord and power the system  on, if power supply's fan and the hard drive run, then the PSU should be good.

Note: Do not remove any wires from the plug, use a small piece of wire or a paper clip as a jumper.

Power supply checks out and the system still does not work, again remove the power cord, hold the power button in for several seconds to discharge the residue power, reconnect the 24-pin connector to the motherboard.

Remove all the PCI cards, the video card [if applicable], memory, all peripherals, disconnect the data and power cables to all the drives, check that the front panel cable is connected to motherboard, with nothing else connected to the system, reconnect the power cable and power the system on.

If you do not get any beep codes and/or there is no change in the diagnostic lights, it would appear that the motherboard and/or the processor has died.

Bev.

 

 


If my answer was helpful, please click: Kudos
Forum Member since 2001
I am not employed by Dell

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Replies (25)
10 Diamond

 Shteve

What is the reading of the power button LED, green, blinking green, solid amber, blinking amber?

Check the sequence of the diagnostic lights on the back panel of the case.

Dell's XPS G3 Troubleshooter is HERE. 

<ADMIN NOTE: Broken link has been removed from this post by Dell>

Bev.

 


If my answer was helpful, please click: Kudos
Forum Member since 2001
I am not employed by Dell

2 Bronze
2 Bronze

Now, I am slightly colorblind, but the power button appeared to be a solid amber. Aside from that, I was unable to locate the diagnostic lights last night ( I believe I couldn't find them last time I looked when I had a very simple problem 5 years ago).

I assume they wouldn't really be hidden, but I could not find them on the exterior of the case. I doubt I had overlooked them as my room was pretty dark and any lights would have stood out pretty well. Should I be looking inside the case for these lights, or is it possible my model for some strange reason does not include them?

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I found a picture in the manual of where the lights are (or should be) so I will check on those again when I get home which likely won't be till very late tonight.

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2 Bronze

Well, unless the diagnostic lights are extremely dim, they are not lighting up at all.

10 Diamond

Shteve

As the power button LED is solid Amber, try the following and start the system to see it makes a difference:

Remove and then reinstall the memory modules.

Remove and then reinstall any cards.

Remove and then reinstall the graphics cards, if applicable.

No difference and if you are comfortable working around computers, you could try the following:

Note: The only 100% method of testing a PSU, is to install a know working power supply.

Unplug the cord from the power supply, hold the power button in for about 15/20 seconds, open the case, unplug the 24-pin power connector from the motherboard and jump the Green wire to one of the Black wires, reconnect the power cord and power the system  on, if power supply's fan and the hard drive run, then the PSU should be good.

Note: Do not remove any wires from the plug, use a small piece of wire or a paper clip as a jumper.

Power supply checks out and the system still does not work, again remove the power cord, hold the power button in for several seconds to discharge the residue power, reconnect the 24-pin connector to the motherboard.

Remove all the PCI cards, the video card [if applicable], memory, all peripherals, disconnect the data and power cables to all the drives, check that the front panel cable is connected to motherboard, with nothing else connected to the system, reconnect the power cable and power the system on.

If you do not get any beep codes and/or there is no change in the diagnostic lights, it would appear that the motherboard and/or the processor has died.

Bev.

 

 


If my answer was helpful, please click: Kudos
Forum Member since 2001
I am not employed by Dell

Community Accepted Solution
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2 Bronze

First of all I would like to thank you for all your help on this issue. I wasn't sure how long it would take to get replies or how much they would help and you've been extremely helpful for both of those.

I finally got around to testing those other things last night and unfortunately there was no change. I haven't looked around and prices and availability for replacing my motherboard and/or processor, but I figure it wouldn't be worth buying new ones for an 6+ year old system. Thanks again for all your help.

10 Diamond

 Shteve

Sorry to hear that and personally, like you,  I would place the money the repairs cost, towards buying a new system with Windows 7, as the XPS G3 has a lot of Dell proprietary parts, especially the power supply.

Bev.

 


If my answer was helpful, please click: Kudos
Forum Member since 2001
I am not employed by Dell

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2 Bronze

Have similar problem and just posted a new thread on it: Power supply test - on button . . etc. (10-28-2010 9:01 PM)  Any thoughts appreciated!     - Bear

10 Diamond

BearPa.

Answered in your other post HERE

Bev.

 


If my answer was helpful, please click: Kudos
Forum Member since 2001
I am not employed by Dell

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