WalterPG
2 Iron

Normal temperatures for desktop CPU and motherboard

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Can someone help me understand what a normal temperature range would be for current desktops with Intel CPUs would be? It was my impression that anything over 70 C was too hot, but I've been challenged about that, and would like to understand this better. Personally I have an Inspiron 660 desktop with an I5-3330 3.0 GHz CPU, and I know these numbers can vary from one CPU and motherboard to another, but I don't want to tell folks their desktop is too hot when it's not. I do a lot of volunteer work locally and on some of the forums. Any info from your best recollection welcome, but a link would be most helpful! TIA
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WalterPG
2 Iron

RE: Normal temperatures for desktop CPU and motherboard

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Good info Rockstar. Thank you very much. From what I've found on the AMD web site, the AMD CPUs are rated at up to 75 or so degrees, and so far I haven't seen anything about their having automatic cutoffs. Also I'm curious about motherboards. I've been told the ICs on them can stand temps up to the 90s, but I'm wondering about the caps and the board wiring. Do you know how hot the caps and solder can get before they have problems.

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speedstep
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RE: Normal temperatures for desktop CPU and motherboard

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There's no such thing as normal in that sense because cooling is passive. cpu-z and other programs do not always give proper readings. Intel® Processors have built-in thermal protection. If the processor gets too hot, the built-in protection shuts down the processor.

http://ark.intel.com/products/65509/Intel-Core-i5-3330-Processor-6M-Cache-up-to-3_20-GHz

TCASE is the max Temp so for this specific cpu its 67.4°C

http://www.intel.com/support/processors/sb/CS-033342.htm

These terms are related to processor temperature for desktop and mobile systems based on Intel® Processors. To allow optimal system operation and long-term reliability, the processor must not exceed the maximum case temperature specifications as defined by the applicable thermal profile.

Tcase is the temperature measurement using a thermocouple embedded in the center of the heat spreader. This initial measurement is done at the factory. Post-manufacturing, Tcase is calibrated by the BIOS, through a reading delivered by a diode between and below the cores.

Tjunction is synonymous with core temperatures, and calculated based on the output from the Digital Thermal Sensor (DTS) using the formula Tjunction = (Tjunction Max – DTS output).

Intel provides a diode between and below the cores with a reading calibrated by the BIOS. This reading can vary greatly between BIOS versions and BIOS vendors.

Below are links to documents that address overheating and prevention of overheating.

How do I know if my computer is overheating?
What do I do if my computer is overheating?
How to apply Thermal Interface Material (TIM)

 

 


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WalterPG
2 Iron

RE: Normal temperatures for desktop CPU and motherboard

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Good info Rockstar. Thank you very much. From what I've found on the AMD web site, the AMD CPUs are rated at up to 75 or so degrees, and so far I haven't seen anything about their having automatic cutoffs. Also I'm curious about motherboards. I've been told the ICs on them can stand temps up to the 90s, but I'm wondering about the caps and the board wiring. Do you know how hot the caps and solder can get before they have problems.

View solution in original post

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speedstep
8 Krypton

RE: Normal temperatures for desktop CPU and motherboard

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Some AMD cpu's go up in smoke literally.


Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues
here

I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating
Contact USA Technical Support






Get Support on Twitter @DellCaresPro

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