wvorderb585
1 Copper

RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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ADAMMSK,

Thanks for the help! Did it fit tightly up next to the metal panel on the right side of the inside? There seems to be just about 5 to maybe 6 inches of space up from the MLB while staying under that panel. If so, would you recommend the Gigabyte over EVGA, MSI, an ASUS?

Appreciating the help!

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Wreks
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RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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@KOEVEN. Is that OEM psu single rail?

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RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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Hi ADAMMSK! 

Did you need a new psu or the 460w worked? 

If with the 460w psu, it worked with the 2 x 6 pin pci express conectors? 

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RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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I did some homework  PSU's before I upgraded.   In my professional life, I do a lot of research and analysis, and I'm a learning enthusiast.   I had the same questions you are asking, and I dug deep enough to satisfy my curiosity.     I'm not an expert, but I'll share what I learned.

First.   What does the wattage on a PSU mean?    Does a 750w PSU use more power than a 460w PSU?   Short Answer.... no.   (Can't remember where I saw that... think it was Tom's Hardware and Yahoo Answers).

The wattage cited on PSU's is "Max Wattage" but most PSU's use scalable power levels.  A 750w power supply is capable of a Peek Output of 750w, but it doesn't run at 750w every second of every day... and the PSU should scale to the demands of the system.

Which 80+ rating do I need?   Does it really make much difference Bronze, Silver, Gold and Platinum?    To most users... not really.   If money is no object, sure.  It's largely about efficiency and heat.   Folks will argue both ways, but I was inclined to trust several experts who said  that  Gold vs Platinum is not much of an issue unless you are building elite Ultimate PC's with 3 video cards.    For them... they said that a $100 difference wasn't really worth the price.   Remember that we are upgrading our 8300/8500/8700 Dells.... so we aren't  "Elite Builders" .   I like anything with any color of an 80+ certification that fits my case.   😉

How big a PSU wattage to do I need?     There are tons of calculators out there.   I think (I saw somewhere) that most of the EVGA 970 cards truly need a reliable 175w to themselves.   They are amazingly efficent, non-power hungry cards for what you get.

Is there even a "One definitive right answer"?    No.   There are just choices.  Some configurations will absolutely not work.   Many configurations, though, can work.   Some may have more risks than each other, but those risks might be the difference between a PSU/Card running 2 years or 5 years.   (And, will you really still want the same Mother Board, CPU or Video card in another 2 years?)

So, in the absence of a "perfect answer", how about a better question?   Here were my thoughts:

Is it better/cooler/safer to run a 750w PSU at 425w usage  (about 60%) or run a 470w at 425w  (89.4% capacity) for extended gaming?  

Bigger PSU's have bigger heat sinks  (typically).   Bigger PSU's often have better cooling and bigger fans (typically).   Bigger PSU's have the option of modular cabling  (so you only need install the cords that are necessary).    Some modular PSU's won't even enable the rails for bare terminals (those without cords in them).  

I'm kind'a passed my Over Clocking,  Constant Tinkering, frequent upgrading "period" of my life.  In my mind, I made a compelling argument to run a higher wattage PSU at a lower threshold.   

So.... in  what I read... the stock PSU will work.  A 600w will work.   A 750w will work.  

None of them will really pull much more power (such that you'd notice a jump on your electric bill with 24/7 uptime).     BUT.... if your PC needed 495w for a few seconds.....  you can do that with a 600w or a 750w.   Not so much with a 475w max PSU.

Another point.   Every time you touch your hardware, you risk accidental damage.    If it ain't broke, do you want to fix it?    I used to build PC's, so I'm comfortable with that stuff.   You'll have to ask yourself.

Ultimately, I think it's largely preference.   Now, when I play video games.... I can go on for 12-18 hours.     I'm not sure I want to run my PSU at 90% of max that long. 

From a practical standpoint, it is probably more important to use"Canned Air" to blow dust out of your PSU about once every three month than to upgrade.   Heat kills components.   Dust reduces heat dissipation.   

I need my PC, and I do preventative maintenance on it like I do my car.   My money situation isn't tight.   I decided I didn't want to get an XBox One, so I was willing to invest the $399 equivalent.    That's why the $69 swap out of the PSU made sense to me.

Is it right?  Is it best?  Would any two people agree?  (Who knows.  It doesn't hurt.  It was a choice.  Seemed to make sense as someone who just wanted to play my games on "Ultimate" and as someone who wasn't trying to impress anyone with a "Cool Build". ).

Hope that helps (though I'm not sure it does?)

-Andrew

adammsk
1 Copper

RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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Actual there was enough room left, but to be sure I'll make few pics tomorrow! I would not give any recommendation, don't want to start holywar over here but I did kind of deep research reading dozens of reviews and not only US based. I had no bias towards any particular brand whatsoever. Simply put - numbers don't lie emoticon.BigSmile.title   

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adammsk
1 Copper

RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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My previous post was for  wvorderb585

Hi ADAMMSK! 

Did you need a new psu or the 460w worked? 

If with the 460w psu, it worked with the 2 x 6 pin pci express conectors? 

The Gigabyte GTX 970 G1 requires minimum 550W PSU with One 6-Pin and One 8-pin External Power Connectors so for this card you have to change OEM PSU.

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Mogle222
1 Nickel

RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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Graphics Card Manufacturer: HIS

Model: HIS R9 270x IceQ X^2 Boost Clock 2GB GDDR5 PCI-E DLDVI-I/HDMI/2xMini DP

Bios:T21G01.301

Operating System: Windows 7 Home

Power Supply: Default 460W works or EVGA 550W Bronze

Compatible:

NO for it used on a XPS 8300 with OY2MRG

Original Card: AMD Radeon HD 6700

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RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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Can anyone confirm if this card works? www.amazon.com/.../ref=ox_sc_sfl_title_1;psc=1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

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RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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Thanks for the advice! 

Just installed the  GTX 970 G1 with a 750W psu (corsair cx750), worked like a charm. 

The psu is huge but it did fit on the xps 8500 case with some work.  

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RE: XPS 8500 compatible graphic card installations and avoiding video BIOS issues

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Wow, Corsair site says that the CX750 is only 5.5in or 140mm long, but it almost looks tighter than my EVGA (which was 165mm).  Maybe it's the shadows in your picture.  

Either way - Good find on another 750w PSU that fits:

www.corsair.com/.../cx750-80-plus-bronze-certified-power-supply

(It kind'a makes me wonder how I got one 15mm longer in the case!)

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