Dan-H
4 Tellurium

RE: XPS 8700 nVidia GTX video card upgrades,

I have a stock xps 8700, i7-4770, 16 gig ram with a Gtx 760. My main issue with this upgrade comes from the lack of power for my monitor. I who am a noob bought a 144hz 27in Gsync Dell monitor the S2716DG without knowing my graphics card can't even hope to make half of the most of it. So now i want to upgrade to be able to play triple A gaming titles on 2560x1440p at good frame rates 60+ maxed out settings and 144hz on low to med settings on old fps games.

You can fit a GTX 1080ti and that's what I would get for a 1440p Gsync monitor.

You must update BIOS to A10 for Win7/8.1 or A11 for Win10.

You will also need a new power supply. I'd go for a 650W top rated unit from Seasonic like a focusPlus or an EVGA G3 650

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AC-1
1 Copper

RE: XPS 8700 nVidia GTX video card upgrades,

Thank you both for weighing in with your experience and knowledge in this matter. It has truly been mind boggling for me ever since i decided to do an upgrade.  After doing more research, do i have any other options for cooling besides:

1. Cryorig H7 Heatsink

2. Replacing the stock exhaust fan at the top back of the case.

3.Including a front in take fan.

I believe Dan you did all these and showed pictures that i found in various topic threads.

With the case being so small this is all I've been able to see anyone do to modify their 8700's to cool the GPU and system. I have yet to see anyone do a 1080/1080 ti or even a 1070 ti so i'm worried about cooling.

There's also the hybrid options like this one:

www.evga.com/.../product.aspx

I'm also not sure if i could install that and possibly place the part with the fan near the front where i saw you placed an intake fan at Dan, the front bottom of the case to the right of their card in that open area by the grill. Though i have heard that the tubes are very rigid so now that i'm thinking about it.. i'm not even sure if a hyrbid card would be able to work.

Cooling definitely seems to be a big issue now. Do you think there is a way to sufficiently cool a 1080 or 1080 ti even a 1070 ti.

No overclocks at all just the card themselves normal.

Is there a passable way to cool them or am i venturing into the territory of the unknown?

I would love to find a cooling solution to use with the xps 8700. Unfortunately, since i don't know how to remove or put in.. any type of parts i'll have to pay a technician to do so. So i can't experiment with no drawbacks.

Is it possible to modify the xps 8700 to be capable of cooling those cards without frying my pc or am i doomed to have to get a different case or just a regular 1070 with the earlier mentioned cooling options. Could you two please shed some light on this for me please.

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Creamiepie
2 Iron

RE: XPS 8700 nVidia GTX video card upgrades,

AC-1,

You can fit a 1080ti on the dell XPS-8900 it will have a snug fit but it will fit. You don't have to cut anything just manuever it properly. You just need to remove the HDD cage hanging on the side and relocate the harddrive below the dvd drive.

You also need to upgrade your PSU to at least a 650w and upgrade the aux fans but the CPU fan is fine as is. Also put a front fan as well.

The 1080ti generates less heat than a 980ti which I have and I use the XPS to mine Bitcoin 24/7 and with the right fan setup the 980ti GPU hums at 100% with only 64°C and all of the components inside hovers between 30-40°C. So if a 980ti which produces a lot of heat can run smoothly inside the XPS case then 1080ti should not be a problem. I currently have a ROG 1080ti which I tried just for fun and it fits but the 1080ti but this bad boy is going into a custom rig unless i change my mind.

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jmerritt74
1 Copper

RE: XPS 8700 nVidia GTX video card upgrades,

I can concur. I was able to get a Founders Edition GTX 1080 into my XPS 8900. However, I did not increase the PSU I am running it with the stock PSU. There are some websites where you can check to see your total power draw and I was well below the estimate. I also didn't add any fans...that being said I am only running 1080p games so it doesn't crank it up too much.

If I was running 1440p or Widescreen I would have upgraded the PSU and fans. My X-Mas gift to myself is a new case, PSU, and MoBo...I will be out of the Dell case. So far though everything is running well.

AC-1
1 Copper

RE: XPS 8700 nVidia GTX video card upgrades,

Thank you everyone your posts, I've decided to do the 1080 ti after reading them all.

I do have some questions though for clarification on cooling.

So if i replace the rear exhaust fan with a stronger one, change out the psu for a 650 or higher like the ones Dan H or Cat and you suggest to me, and remove the HDD cage and place a(i'm still not sure which size) 92mm or 120mm at the bottom(front intake fan) and possibly another fan above that.. it should keep the temps in control gaming at 2560x1440p 144hz gsync?

when you say auxiliary fan, your speaking of changing out the rear exhaust fan for a much better one right?

I have my OS on my msata underneath/near the GPU and one HDD so taking out the cage is fine and relocating the HDD. The heaviest thing i do is gaming, no type of rendering or photoshop none of that stuff just general use and gaming.

Will making all those changes keep my temps cool and my msata and hard drive in a safe temp range so my gpu doesn't burn them to death?

This would be with using the 1080 ti Founder's edition either the Nvidia's or Evga's version in the XPS 8700 case.

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Dan-H
4 Tellurium

RE: XPS 8700 nVidia GTX video card upgrades,

rear case fan is 92mm.  I used a Noctua NF-B9. It got it on amazon, and looks like current pricing is about $15. The fan includes a splitter. This allows the single fan header on the board to run the rear exhaust and the front intake.

I used a 120mm front case fan that I had sitting around. It is a cougar, but I don't have the part number handy.I think a 140mm would fit.

I'm not a fan of the blower style cards. I find them to be noisy. Some like them. YMMV

I like the dual fan versions but the drawback of the dual fan style is you have to get the hot air out of of the case else it will just collect and swirl around -- which is why the front case fan helps.

cutting and drilling holes you have to just wing it because the front panel has some openings. It took me about an hour to do, but it wasn't pretty -- and I only had about an hour to get it done.

- - - - OR - - - -

Just buy a new case and move everything. It will be quieter, run cooler have fan locations ready to install, provide access to the backside of the MoBo without having to remove the Mobo from the case. The better cases have the power supply on the bottom and the intake air from the PSU pulls from the bottom of the case so it runs cooler.  To be candid, after doing the case mods, I think I'd buy a new case before doing it again.

There are literally a gazillion cases out there and the hardest part of doing this is matching the pinout of the on-off button to the mobo, and that's been solved already.  details are in this thread.

en.community.dell.com/.../19629462

Give it some thought. there are some really good cases in the $75 price range.