Highlighted
sabrinaf
1 Nickel

XPS8300 Broadcom Netlink TM Gigabit Ethernet replacement

Jump to solution

I need to replace my XPS8300 Broadcom Netlink TM Gigabit Ethernet card and I was told by DELL that it's not available.  Can someone tell me a good network card to replace the existing one?

Thanks in advance.

0 Kudos
4 Replies
7 Plutonium

RE: XPS8300 Broadcom Netlink TM Gigabit Ethernet replacement

Jump to solution

The Ethernet "card" in the XPS 8300 is actually built into the motherboard.

Why do you think the onboard NIC has to be replaced? Sure it's a hardware issue and not software?

Easiest way to do this would be a USB>Ethernet dongle.  Plugs into any USB port on the PC. I use one with my notebook which doesn't have onboard Ethernet. Not very expensive and works fine. A USB3>Ethernet dongle will give better performance than a USB2>Ethernet dongle, assuming you have an USB3 port available  on your PC.

Other alternative would be to use WiFi. If your XPS 8300 didn't come with an add-in WiFi card, you could get a USB>WiFi dongle.  Get one that supports the 802.11 "ac" WiFi standard, which is currently the fastest, assuming your router supports "ac". Otherwise get an 802.11 "n" WiFi dongle.  

Ron

   Forum Member since 2004
   I am not a Dell employee

0 Kudos
sabrinaf
1 Nickel

RE: XPS8300 Broadcom Netlink TM Gigabit Ethernet replacement

Jump to solution

Thanks for the response RoHe.  I'm having trouble with my wifi modem reporting astronomical data download numbers.  I changed the modem, changed the ethernet cable, disabled the wifi card in device manager.  I thought maybe the ethernet card is causing problems with the modem.

0 Kudos
7 Plutonium

RE: XPS8300 Broadcom Netlink TM Gigabit Ethernet replacement

Jump to solution

Scanned thoroughly for malware lately?

Is this a router/modem in one unit or do you have a separate WiFi router and a separate modem?

Is the PC connected to the WiFi router by an Ethernet cable? What devices are connected by WiFi?

Has somebody gained unauthorized access to your WiFi network? Do you have security enabled on your WiFi network, eg,  WPA2 + AES ?

You probably need a username and password to access the WiFi router's settings software, and -hopefully- a different network access password that every WiFi device must use to talk to the router. Suggest you change the router's username/password and the device network access password ASAP.  

The router's setup software may have a screen showing what devices are connected to your network. Make sure you can identify every device that's listed (eg, PCs, laptops, phones, tablets, TVs etc). If you can't ID a device, look for the option to block the device on that screen. Look at what's connected at different times of the day, so you see what's logging on. Even if you block all unknown devices, you should still change the username/password and access password ASAP.

Some routers have the option not to broadcast the SSID (the name you gave to your network, assuming you changed the default name, which you should). So you might also consider turning off SSID broadcast.  Your network will still work properly, but your network won't be visible to anyone looking for WiFi networks in your area.  Keep in mind that when you want to authorize a new WiFi device, you'll have to turn on the SSID again, so the new device can see it and get connected, and then turn SSID broadcast off again.

Ron

   Forum Member since 2004
   I am not a Dell employee

0 Kudos
7 Plutonium

RE: XPS8300 Broadcom Netlink TM Gigabit Ethernet replacement

Jump to solution

And one more thing... A security hole was recently identified in the way WiFi works, regardless of what hardware is being used.

So check the manufacturer's website for your specific WiFi router model to see if there's a firmware update to fix the problem.  Carefully follow the directions to download and update the router...

Ron

   Forum Member since 2004
   I am not a Dell employee

0 Kudos