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Can I use an Australia Power Supply/Cord for US Dell Laptop?

There are plenty of posts in this forum and on the web that discuss using power adaptors and power converters for those who are TRAVELING (i.e., temporarily) to other countries, but I can't seem to find any information as to whether it's okay to purchase a power supply/cord from an electronics store in a foreign country for my specific device and use it in my USA Dell Inspiron 15 laptop (or any other common electronic device such as a mobile phone).

I am MOVING (i.e., not temporarily traveling, but permanently residing) to Australia and have a Dell laptop (among other USA products such as my mobile phone, etc.) that I purchased in the USA and that came with a USA power cord, so I don't want to use a power converter or adaptor indefinitely while in Australia.  Similarly, I don't want to get rid of my expensive USA devices (laptop, mobile phone) that otherwise work perfectly fine here in the USA.

What I would like to do is bring my USA Dell laptop and Samsung Android phone with me to Australia, throw away the existing USA power cables/supply, and simply walk into an electronics store there and buy an Australia power supply for those specific devices (as if I initially had purchased the devices there in Australia but lost the cord).

Will doing so harm my devices?

In other words, are my USA devices (i.e., Dell Laptop and Samsung Andoird phone) built to some "USA spec" and then using an Australia power supply will damage them; or, does the power supply/cord purchased in another country (i.e., Australia) automatically take the current from the wall and make it work with the specific Dell (laptop) or Samsung (phone) product, regardless, somehow using the cord to automatically converting the power from the country's wall supply to a universal "country-independent" spec for the device?

I hope this post makes sense and someone knows the answer Smiley Happy Thanks!

 

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6 Replies
JOcean
4 Ruthenium

Re: Can I use an Australia Power Supply/Cord for US Dell Lap

The Dell computer components are the same. The adapter is made to work with the particular wall receptacle in the region you live. The adapter converts the voltage to the appropriate voltage needed for the System. But if you are buying a new adapter for your laptop consider that if you buy a generic adapter and not genuine Dell, the laptop may not recognize it and may not properly charge (or charge at all) the battery.

What is the model number of your computer please?




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Re: Can I use an Australia Power Supply/Cord for US Dell Lap

Thanks for the information and timely response Smiley Happy

Model Number is P65F (P65F001) for a Dell Inspiron 15 7567 - 15.6"

Purchased in USA.

 

 

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nyc10036
3 Zinc

Re: Can I use an Australia Power Supply/Cord for US Dell Lap


@BocaKayakerDave wrote:

Thanks for the information and timely response Smiley Happy

Model Number is P65F (P65F001) for a Dell Inspiron 15 7567 - 15.6"

Purchased in USA.

 

 


You must use a Dell AC adapter.

The AC adapter is two parts --- the part the connects to the laptop and the part that connects to the wall outlet. The latter is what needs to be changed when you are in Australia. 

 .

Re: Can I use an Australia Power Supply/Cord for US Dell Lap

Great! Thank you so much for answering my question Smiley Happy

I will assume the same is true of my Samsung Galaxy Android smartphone... that I can simply buy a Samsung charger from a wireless store there in Australia (e.g., Optus, Telstra, etc.) and a similar process will occur when connecting from the wall directly to the device.

If I am mistaken (or you don't know), please let me know. 

Thanks again!

 

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nyc10036
3 Zinc

Re: Can I use an Australia Power Supply/Cord for US Dell Lap


@BocaKayakerDave wrote:

Great! Thank you so much for answering my question Smiley Happy

I will assume the same is true of my Samsung Galaxy Android smartphone... that I can simply buy a Samsung charger from a wireless store there in Australia (e.g., Optus, Telstra, etc.) and a similar process will occur when connecting from the wall directly to the device.

If I am mistaken (or you don't know), please let me know. 

Thanks again!

 


Yes you are correct. 

https://www.worldstandards.eu/electricity/plugs-and-sockets/

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jphughan
5 Tungsten

Re: Can I use an Australia Power Supply/Cord for US Dell Lap

Fyi as long as you know what the electrical standard in your country of interest is (easy to find on the Internet), you can check this on basically any piece of electrical equipment yourself by looking at the fine print on your device or its power adapter.  The US uses 110-120V at 60 Hz, and if you look at the fine print on the back of the "brick" portion of an AC adapter, you'll see that it says it works with 100-240V and 50-60 Hz -- so you're covered.  Again, just about every device includes this type of labeling.  If the label indicates that your devices supports the electricity "profile" of your target country, then you just need a basic adapter so that you can physically plug the device into the electrical socket in the foreign country.  One major item that does NOT work in countries with different voltages and/or Hz is surge protectors.  However, a basic "tap" that just breaks one outlet into more sockets rather than offering any sort of protection would work fine -- so if you'll be traveling with a lot of devices and don't expect to have enough outlets or plug adapters with you, one option is to buy a multi-way tap in your home country, then use a plug adapter to connect THAT to an outlet in the foreign country, and then plug all of your equipment into the tap without adapters.

If you need to use equipment that doesn't natively support the voltage and/or Hz of the foreign country, you'd need an active converter, but those typically come in two versions.  The first category are the small, cheap converters that explicitly warn against using them with sensitive electronics.  I've had friends destroy laptop AC adapters with these.  They're basically meant for things like hair dryers.  The second category are the ones that can power electronics properly, but they're large are fairly expensive.  Fortunately most electronics are now "global".

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