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Last reply by 11-13-2017 Solved
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Super Speed USB 3.0 Docking Station - No power to laptop?

Laptop is on and plugged into the docking station which is "powered".  Connection to monitor / keyboard and mouse is fine, however I'm surprised to see a lower power - plug is soon message.  Isn't docking station supposed to provide power to the laptop?

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What model laptop are you using?  The newer USB-C standard can accept enough power from external peripherals to charge most laptop models, and consequently Dell has newer docks that support this, namely the D6000, WD15, and TB16.  There are some important differences between them, but they all require USB-C, and the TB16 requires a Thunderbolt-enabled USB-C connector.

The discussion between port replicator and docking station is pointless, mostly because there isn't an absolutely correct answer.  This dock fell into category limbo.  Port replicators historically did not support video output, and docking stations were able to charge docked laptops.  The D3000 supports video output but not charging.


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After about an hour trying to find out why my brand new laptop was losing battery power, I find that I have to plug my laptop in IN ADDITION to plugging the "docking station" into power. As someone above said, "I have used Dell docking stations for years at work and never had to connect the laptop separately to charge the battery."  I also agree that this is NOT a docking station, but a port replicator. I waiting FOUR MONTHS for delivery of the so-called "docking station" and now I still have  too many things plugged into the laptop. ***?  Considering returning the "port replicator". Extremely disappointed. Also, it really *** that you con't find decent help on the Dell website.    A very grumpy customer.

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KohlerTFD, you just made two posts, one saying the dock doesn't provide power and the next one saying that it does.  To be clear, the USB 3.0 dock does NOT supply power to the laptop it is connected to. The newer USB-C and Thunderbolt docks do. As I've said earlier, USB 3.0 is only capable of providing ~7.5 watts while also carrying data (and is only required to provide 4.5 watts), which is far short of ANY laptop's requirements, and even if that weren't an issue, it doesn't even allow power to flow from peripheral to host as would be required for this scenario; with USB 3.0, power can only flow from host to peripheral, e.g. so the laptop can charge a smartphone.

As for how to define "docking station", to my knowledge that was never formally codified across the industry. I've never seen another docking station that didn't provide power to the laptop either, but on the other hand, I'd never seen a device called a port replicator that included video outputs as this one does, so I'm not sure that name would have been appropriate either.


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Of course the power is relayed to the laptop via the docking station.  You are playing with words here.  To most human beings, the dock is powered by the adapter.  The dock is then powering the laptop that is connected to the dock.  If you wanted to get literal about it, you could have said the power transformer on the phone pole outside is actually powering the laptop, not the power adapter.

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@ieee488:  I disagree.  I have had many Dell docking stations that charge my laptop.   This thing Dell called a docking station is not one, since it does not supply power to the laptop without another power adapter.

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Is there no situation where the laptop can even receive minimal power from the USB 3.0? Are there any work arounds to having to plug in the laptop ac adapter every time?

Just for clarity, you don't have to plug the AC adapter into the laptop to use the dock, so if your battery has enough juice, you're fine.  Otherwise, no there are no workarounds.  The USB 3.0 spec only specifies 4.5 W of power (900 mA @ 5V), whereas a typical laptop AC adapter provides 45-65W; the other problem is that in USB 3.0, host devices (such as laptops, as opposed to slave devices like the peripherals you would attach to them) can only provide power, not receive it.  This all changes with USB Type-C, where power can flow in either direction and the maximum power is raised all the way to 100 W, but of course that only helps if you have a laptop and power-providing peripheral that both have USB Type-C.  So yes, this problem has been fixed, but not in a way that's going to help you with your current hardware.


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Is there no situation where the laptop can even receive minimal power from the USB 3.0? Are there any work arounds to having to plug in the laptop ac adapter every time?

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http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/162017404325?lpid=82&chn=ps&ul_noapp=true  

This is one of many. I used to have a 12" Dell for a few years and it had a docking station which had its own AC and charged the laptop. The tiny bit of credibility you may have had is gone, really.

7 Plutonium
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What about Precision M3800 e Docking D1000? Ac power of the docking has only 45W, while the Precision AC has 130W.

Those docking stations do not power the laptop.  They're essentially somewhere between port replicators of yore and full docking stations in that they provide all connectivity (including dual displays) EXCEPT power, so if you wanted a dedicated power supply for your laptop at that docking station, you'd need to buy and connect one separately from the docking station, which connects only via USB 3.0.  Also, I think the D1000 is obsolete now and there are newer ones that support higher resolution displays, for example.


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What about Precision M3800 e Docking D1000? Ac power of the docking has only 45W, while the Precision AC has 130W.
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