UnDeR_FLiP
Copper

Dell 2000FP Monitor

Hello everyone,
I am new here and I have a concern. I have owned a Dell 2000FP monitor for close to 2 years now. It has recently begun to not turn on. The power button on the front does not seem to work when pressed, and when I unplug/plug manualy from the wall all of the lights on the front panel light up, but will not turn off...nor does the screen turn on. I'm wondering if the monitor is cacked, or is there a reset button on it somewhere that may possibly fix the problem. I do not beleive the monitor is still covered under and warrenty.

Thanks!

Daryl
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23 Replies

The investigation will begin.

Well, after some quick research, it seems that all LED's on in the Front Panel (FP) display indicates a faulty main logic board. After a quick (20 minutes) call to Dell Spare Parts, they claimed to have no such replacement part and could not locate a reconditioned one either. I will be taking it apart today, and will respond again to let everyone know if it is an easy fix or not. BTW, to be clear, all FP LED's are lit, as well as both modes of the power LED, making it seem green and amber at the same time. That is important, as any other combination could indicate a different failure.

More on this later...
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Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

I had this same problem.  My Dell customer service experience would have been funny if it hadn't been so pathetic - the tech support person I reached (whom I assume was offshore) could do nothing for me without an order number, and it took many minutes to arrive at this conclusion.  I bought my Dell 2000FP from someone retail a couple years ago, and Dell customer service had no interest in looking at the serial number.
 
Anyway, I sent the monitor to "sunrise technology" in California and for $150 they replaced the system board.  I talked with them first to describe symptoms.
 
When I got it back, it worked better; sometimes it would do funny things when I shut off the machine, like spraying weird horizontal lines all over and/or refusing to turn off or functioning fine but none of the buttons would light, but the display worked again.  It even had several weeks where it worked perfectly.  I think it's been four or five months and now it's "dead" again - all lights on (including both the green and yellow behind the main power light) so I assume the main board is again upset.
 
I assume there is a cottage industry of refurbishing some part on these mainboards that keeps going wonky.  I have no idea what part that is - do they have to lift a QFP chip and put a new one on, which requires tools, skill, and technique?  Or do they replace a SM capacitor which any monkey with delicate hands could do?
 
eBay has at least one seller listing refurbished main boards (search for "Dell 2000FP Logic" ) for $60.
 
I only wish my Dell 2000 FP would stay healthy.  It worked great for such a long time, and I find the viewability and pixel response characteristics great for my regular use and gaming use.  On the one hand, I'd consider buying another, but on the other hand I don't want to send more money to Dell for a monitor that appears to contain a timebomb flaw. Smiley Sad
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adrian57
Copper

Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

I just found my way to this thread while trying to diagnose my 2000FP problem. It's the same mode of failure as above - all panel LEDs lit (including the dual color LED) when powered-up. I found by trial and error that it could be taken past this point by repeatedly connecting and disconnecting the power supply from the mains. It might take a dozen or so attempts, but lately this is how I start my day! Once the screen is working it seems to stay working (although I've also had it working and stay working even though all the LEDs came on and the buttons froze part way through the day!)
 
Anyway, I've stripped it down to the control board and checked obvious things like power supply voltages. NOTE: I'm an experienced electronics engineer and know how to take sensible precautions in the presence of HIGH VOLTAGES! Everything at this simple level seems in order. My guess is that one of the controller chips (playing a supervisory role?) is looking for a voltage somewhere to be in spec and is refusing to sequence everything up it if it's not happy. Perhaps this is before it initialises the video processor such that once powered up OK the video stays working even when the supervisor goes AWOL. As has been mentioned capacitors are the most likely culprits because they do suffer the effects of age - but which one!
 
Unfortunately I have a limited amount of time to continue investigating this fault, but it sure is looking like a "common" failure mode. That means someone out there probably already knows what's going wrong - and I bet they'll be milking it for everything they can get.
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Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

Simple question - haven't these got a 3 year warrantee?
2 ys = trouble & no warrantee = expensive.
cheers

Message Edited by KevinR100 on 10-02-2006 12:34 PM

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LUH3417
Copper

Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

It seems that when good electronics go bad, its usually the power supply, or the capacitors. My 2000FP is OK so far, but I have 2 friends with dead ones. This could be worth a try https://www.delladapterprogram.com/MultiOrder.aspx ...not sure what caused the recall. They say it may take 30 days to get it. I bought an adapter from a third party and it had the right part number but the wrong pins on the DC plug, go figure. So now we will try the free Dell replacement. Interestingly, I think this same power supply does double duty for some Dell laptops. But who knows, it may be the power supply is fine and the mainboard is dying in some way. Or that the power supply fries the mainboards when it goes off the rails.
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adrian57
Copper

Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

LUH3417 - good point about the PSU. I forgot it wasn't only laptops that were affected by the recall. However, the supply was the first thing I eliminated when things started to go wrong. Mine's not one of the bad ones anyway and although it gets worryingly hot (like most switch mode supplies) it puts out a steady 20Volts all the time.
 
It's a very frustrating fault this one. The display is fine once the monitor can be persuaed to get to a certian point in its initialisation. From this point on it doesn't seem to matter if it "crashes" or not. OK, so the buttons & menus wont work but that's not a problem if all you want is to see your desktop! Having said this, once in a while the screen blanks out altogether (always at an awkward moment!). So far it always comes back after a few power cycles though.
 
I rather wish it had failed totally - then I wouldn't feel so bad about getting a replacement. Only the fact that it cost a small fortune three or four years ago and that it's still semi-servicable prevents me from using it as electronic spare parts
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LUH3417
Copper

Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

The good news is, received my replacement power supply (external brick) today. The bad news is, the one we got from Dell, as well as another we bought online, have a 3-pin power plug on the monitor end. is going on? These parts all have the same Dell part number, but have different DC plugs. My monitor wants a standard round 2-pin plug, these new parts all come with a squarish 3-pin plug (though I think only 2 of the 3 are used). How can a company make 2 different parts but give them the same part number? And how can they make a $1000 monitor that dies after 4 years.
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Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

I originally said -
Simple question - haven't these got a 3 year warrantee?
 
Why should anyone try to help & be ignored?
 
Maybe the original poster went & got an exchange as he should have.
 
good day - maybe
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Re: Dell 2000FP Monitor

When I called Dell Tech Support, it took me ten minutes to establish that they had no intent to assist me without an order number.  They did not appear to understand the concept that I could be in possession of a Dell monitor without having ordered it from them.  The serial number and date of manufacture on the back of the monitor was of no interest to them.
 
Now, this was mostly annoying.  I got a lot of life from the thing, and my complaint is not that it broke, but that they were incompetent about even suggesting to me what I might do to with the thing other than throw it in the trash.  I was (and am) convinced a company so vast would be warranty-fixing these things for customers who _did_ have their order numbers, so they'd be all set up to receive, repair, and return them and the only thing tricky was making sure I paid whatever they wanted.
 
But I found the tech support experience included no brain cells to be able to work outside the single thought of "order number".
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