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2 Bronze

Optiplex 9010 upgrade

Hi Group,

I have the above mentioned desktop which has been trouble free. Running Windows 7 pro, 64 bit, 8 gb ram, I7-3770 processor. I ignored the free upgrade to Windows 10 unfortunately, is there a way to still get windows 10 free? 

If so I'm considering upping my ram and getting a SSD. It seems this computer could still have some life left.

Thanks for suggestion/comments

Best 

Replies (20)

@speedstep  Much like most regular PCI-E 3.0 expansion cards the M.2 PCI-E SSDs are compatible with 2.0 standard. Obviously it decreases the maximum speed to something like 1500 MB/s (if the SSD uses 4 lanes).

On a side note, the Optiplex 9010 in question not only has the PCI-E 2.0 lanes connected to the Q77 PCH, but it also has PCI-E 3.0 lanes connected to the i7 3770 CPU.

USB 3 is not PCI-E version 3.0

SATA 3 is not PCI-E version 3.0

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/64027/intel-q77-express-chipset.html

Q77 chipset is PCI-E 2.0

 


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@speedstep  The Q77 has 8 PCIe 2.0 lanes, those are connected to the x4 slot and x1 slot.

The x16 slot is connected to the CPU, the i7 3770 supports PCIe 3.0, if Intel is anything to go by:

https://ark.intel.com/content/www/us/en/ark/products/65719/intel-core-i7-3770-processor-8m-cache-up-...

image.png

 

 

Even with 4 lanes, the PCIe 2.0 may bottleneck the SSD, but with entry level SSDs there may not be much of a difference.


@Maho Jakobic wrote:

@speedstep  Never? The 9010 does have PCI-E x16 and x16 wired as x4 slots. There are many PCI-E to M.2 PCI-E adapters on the market and installing one of those is about as difficult as installing graphics card or other expansion card. Windows 10 is going to recognize the drive.

Booting Windows 10 from such drive may be more challenging, as the 9010 may not support it as a boot option, but even that can be bypassed by using boot manager on supported boot media such as USB (flash) drive.

Admittedly it may be more complicated, more expensive (2,5" SATA SSDs are pretty cheap) and chances are most users wont even notice the performance increase over SATAIII, but it seems like an option.


Totally agree.

In other systems with PCIe 2.0, I've upgraded from a slower SATA II SSD (~280 MB/s) to faster a M.2 NVMe SSD (~1700 MB/s), which in my opinion was totally worth it.  Note these performance numbers are only for large files.

The Optiplex 9010 has SATA III (~560 MB/s), so upgrading to NVMe won't be as big a jump.  And, as Maho Jakobic has mentioned, it can be more complicated to set up as a boot drive, especially since the Optiplex 9010 doesn't appear to natively boot NVMe.  Using a M.2 NVMe SSD as a data drive is easy, though.

That the Optiplex 9010 will "NEVER HAVE M2 PCI-E" is easily debunked by searching* actual system configs on userbenchmark.com.  Since the M.2 NVMe Samsung 950 PRO is special and bootable in almost any system (even non-UEFI systems) I did a search and found one running in an Optiplex 9010 here.  Note it's marked as the "System drive".  So, debunked.  As Maho Jakobic alluded to, Clover could be used to chain boot from a USB stick which adds working UEFI NVMe boot support (as software rather than firmware) to Windows 10 running on almost any M.2 NVMe SSD, but it's complicated to set up.  I've used both the 950 PRO and Clover to run Windows 10 on NVMe in a Dell system older than the Optiplex 9010.

 

*To see if someone's running a specific SSD/HD/graphics card, etc. in your system go to userbenchmark.com and search for your system from search area in upper-right corner. Once your specific system is selected scroll down and click on "Best Build (Edit with custom PC builder)". On left-hand side remove with gray "X" all of CPU, GPU, SSD and RAM - leaving only MBD (the motherboard/system model). Then click desired tab ("SSD" in this case) and "Change Baseline SSD". To see how many benchmarks have this criteria, click "Load baseline user benchmarks" in lower-left section of page. (If that button is not present, there are no benchmarks with your criteria.) From the list of benchmarks, you can click and drill down to system specifics.

 

Thanks everyone, mostly way over my head but I've learned a bit more about my machine. I'm awaiting the OEM disk I ordered from the link speedstep provided, thanks!

Do I understand correctly that even though I have a Win7 Pro COA number that I shouldn't or can't use it during the OS installation?

And that I would register Win10 after installation through the settings menu? 

You can just download the Win 10 iso from MS. Run setup to upgrade and when you go online it should automatically activate.

If it doesn't automatically activate and if there's no automatic pop-up to activate it, an Activate Windows option should show in the Control Panel.




- Please kudos posts you like!
- Please "Accept as Solution" posts that are a solution.
- If you have an Optiplex, stating its model number AND size speeds up troubleshooting. Components vary.

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I'm a big fan of Dell, a Dell user, and not an employee. This forum is user to user with occasional assistance by other Rockstars or Dell employees.

Wanted to drop a quick note of thanks to all that commented on this thread. 

Here's a run down.

Replaced the cmos battery

Reapplied heat sink thermal past to processor, after 7 years the original was quite dry.

Increased ram from 8 to 16 GB

Installed an EVO 860 250 GB SSD for the OS. Samsung magician software is the bomb.

Loaded Win 10 Pro 64 bit from the OEM disc suggested by Speedstep, from Newegg.

Win 10 Automatically activated!

Installed Dell command update. When I ran Dell command for the first time there was a box to check if the OS had just been clean installed. I checked yes and it downloaded and installed 11 drivers automatically, nice. 

I'm stoked with how well this went with all your guidance, and the computer is running much faster now. 

It's great I can keep this machine running for the foreseeable future!

Happy Holidays

 

The OEM disk will ask for a product key.

You press the "I dont have a key" option.

You then install the version of windows that is on the COA

Home is Home

Pro or Ultimate is PRO

There is no WIN10 ultimate so the key for 7 pro or 7 ultimate will work to activate once you get online.

You either change the key or run Admin Command Prompt and SLUI.EXE  3

OR

Click Start, type: cmd

Right click CMD click Run as administrator

 

At the command prompt, type the following commands:

slmgr.vbs -ipk xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx (allows you to replace the current product key with the specified)

xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx - represents your product key

Hit Enter on your keyboard

Exit the command prompt

Restart your computer 

 

 


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5 Iridium

Hi @GeodeNZ,

If you compare SSD transfer speeds, you'll find a 256GB is slightly faster than a 128GB SSD, but won't be noticeable if you compared use side by side with the same system.  I'd go with the size you want first.

Increasing RAM and using a SSD definitely increases speed.  I did that with my 755 and even the lagging USB's speeded up and don't lag anymore.

You're system is also SATA III.  If you bought a new PC, like an Optiplex, with an I7, it would have SATA III.  Add more than 8GB of RAM.  And the system wouldn't be cheap and wouldn't hardly be cost effective as compared to what you want to do.

Newer than 9010 Optiplex's don't have the numbers for diagnostic l.e.d.'s, just a blinking power button to decipher if something goes wrong.  Mini towers are smaller with smaller PSU's so upgrade options are a bit limited.

A 9010 with an I7 is what I want to replace my 755.

Also, before investing in RAM, you might try the SSD first, then see if you want more RAM.  It sounds like you're current RAM is sufficient for what you use it for.  My 755 MT with 8GB ram seemlessly runs recording studio software, yet it's a SATA II system.  (I still want SATA III.  In some ways, it still has my 755 beat.)

If using non-Dell RAM, Crucial comes highly recommended by the Rockstars in this forum.  It's guaranteed to work in Dell's and has a lifetime warranty.  Not wanting to invest that much in my 755, I use A-Tech, which also has a lifetime warranty.

The 9010's tech is still relevant in today's world.  Optiplex's were built to stay that way a long time.

Optiplex 9010 Tech Guide 

So, how's all that?




- Please kudos posts you like!
- Please "Accept as Solution" posts that are a solution.
- If you have an Optiplex, stating its model number AND size speeds up troubleshooting. Components vary.

Code of Conduct
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I'm a big fan of Dell, a Dell user, and not an employee. This forum is user to user with occasional assistance by other Rockstars or Dell employees.

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