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8 Krypton

Re: Oracle-related questions for a refresh..

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WBGaynor,

Good call on posting those questions to the Oracle Pre-sales Minor community!

8 Krypton

Re: Oracle-related questions for a refresh..

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Bill.. Thanks.. Great idea...

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8 Krypton

Re: Oracle-related questions for a refresh..

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To continue this thread, and to consolidate (Before posting on the Oracle Minors site), in light of the additional options available to customers for Oracle workloads, (Flash technology), we should also ask

1. What their current Oracle IO profile is (and then position either a complimentary Oracle AWR analysis through MiTrend, or the DBClassify Professional Service (depending on the propensity of the customer to purchase it)

2. Will they benefit from all-Flash arrays and technologies, and / or will you benefit from sub-millisecond response times being offered out-of-the-box by all-Flash arrays such as XtremIO ?

3. Are you evaluating other all-Flash arrays such as Pure, or Flash card technologies like Fusion-IO ?

4. What array are they today for Oracle ? (And does it primarily have one type of disk, say SAS, or does it have tiering capabilities ? Or do they pin specific 'hot' tablespaces to faster disk (say EFD)

Thanks..

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8 Krypton

Re: Oracle-related questions for a refresh..

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Sam:

Eventually, I think when we get to the Software Defined Data Center (SDDC), then the wire is irrelevant and the protocol arguably no longer matters (or perhaps a better way to say it would be that you can run whatever protocol you like on whatever wire you like).

Cisco now makes switches which allow you to change out the module which determines the wire and protocol. MDS, for example, can switch on the fly between FC and IP / 10 GbE. Once we get to the point where we can do that in software (and we are very close to that point right now), then the entire protocol argument is over.

Which has primarily been about latency and bandwidth anyway. The benchmark for a performant network technology at the moment is Infiniband (IB). In a pre-SDDC context, IB provides theoretically about 40 GbE of throughput with small single-digit millisecond to low triple-digit microseconds in latency. (See: InfiniBand - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.) But after SDDC, IP / Ethernet (or whatever they are going to call it in the post-SDDC context) will provide 100 GbS of throughput with very similar latency as IB.

At that point, the network is no longer the bottleneck, arguably. We will flood the bus, and the CPU layer will then become the bottleneck for a while.

It will be interesting soon!

Regards,

Jeff