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Microsoft, Others Closing In On VMware In Server Virtualization Market

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According to this article, the installation base market share for major vendors:

VMWare        65%

Microsoft        27%

Citrix/Redhat  8%

Also, it looks like KVM is picking up in a very fast pace.

http://www.networkcomputing.com/virtualization/microsoft-others-closing-in-on-vmware-in/232901383?pg...

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Re: Microsoft, Others Closing In On VMware In Server Virtualization Market

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An old Comparison...

Microsoft Hyper-V R2 pros

  • Familiar interface: Some customers prefer using products from just one vendor, and Hyper-V virtualization is a more natural transition from Windows server environments. The virtualization management engine with System Center adds features for customers in a simple tiered approach, from the application to the OS, and lastly, to the virtualization engine. For organizations that have a large investment in other System Center technologies, such as Operations Manager, System Center Virtual Machine Manager for Hyper-V may be a natural addition.
  • Broad hardware compatibility: Being part of Windows Server 2008 R2, Hyper-V R2 benefits by having the same driver support. While VMware is expanding its product line and has also added the new pluggable storage architecture, Windows device support can't be beat.
  • Integration with existing virtualization infrastructure: Customers want to capitalize on existing investments. Most environments have some level of Microsoft Windows Server investment, and expanding that investment to include Hyper-V may be attractive.

Microsoft Hyper-V R2 cons

  • vendor support: For software publishers that do have virtualization support, Hyper-V R2 is not frequently listed as one of the products they support. While virtualization support is determined by a number of factors, Hyper-V isn't the most supported hypervisor for third-party applications.
  • Features gap: Hyper-V virtualization goes deeper with some features, such as alert management and monitoring within the guest virtual machine's OS with System Center Operations Manager and integration with Group Policy. VSphere has more virtualization-specific features that are more important to infrastructure architects. Hyper-V does not yet offer a fault tolerance virtual machine (VM) that runs concurrently on two hosts, and it has fewer virtualization-specific disaster recovery options than vSphere.
  • VMDK options
  • Replication options.

Anything I miss to Add?

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Re: Microsoft, Others Closing In On VMware In Server Virtualization Market

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An old Comparison...

Microsoft Hyper-V R2 pros

  • Familiar interface: Some customers prefer using products from just one vendor, and Hyper-V virtualization is a more natural transition from Windows server environments. The virtualization management engine with System Center adds features for customers in a simple tiered approach, from the application to the OS, and lastly, to the virtualization engine. For organizations that have a large investment in other System Center technologies, such as Operations Manager, System Center Virtual Machine Manager for Hyper-V may be a natural addition.
  • Broad hardware compatibility: Being part of Windows Server 2008 R2, Hyper-V R2 benefits by having the same driver support. While VMware is expanding its product line and has also added the new pluggable storage architecture, Windows device support can't be beat.
  • Integration with existing virtualization infrastructure: Customers want to capitalize on existing investments. Most environments have some level of Microsoft Windows Server investment, and expanding that investment to include Hyper-V may be attractive.

Microsoft Hyper-V R2 cons

  • vendor support: For software publishers that do have virtualization support, Hyper-V R2 is not frequently listed as one of the products they support. While virtualization support is determined by a number of factors, Hyper-V isn't the most supported hypervisor for third-party applications.
  • Features gap: Hyper-V virtualization goes deeper with some features, such as alert management and monitoring within the guest virtual machine's OS with System Center Operations Manager and integration with Group Policy. VSphere has more virtualization-specific features that are more important to infrastructure architects. Hyper-V does not yet offer a fault tolerance virtual machine (VM) that runs concurrently on two hosts, and it has fewer virtualization-specific disaster recovery options than vSphere.
  • VMDK options
  • Replication options.

Anything I miss to Add?

View solution in original post

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Re: Microsoft, Others Closing In On VMware In Server Virtualization Market

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Fully agree.

If you do miss something here, I would have to say that it depends on how Microsoft plays game here.

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Re: Microsoft, Others Closing In On VMware In Server Virtualization Market

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I expect Microsoft to gain some market share due to license costs for the operating systems... Especially testing, developing and acceptance environments will move to Hyper-V infrastructures.

Costs will be the biggest, maybe only reason to implement Hyper-V instead of ESXi. From technical point of view, I won't recommend a shift to Hyper-V at this moment. Maybe I will in a couple of years.

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