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Last reply by 09-12-2022 Unsolved
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2 Jasper
2 Jasper
213

Mystery Drive Partion(s)

I just looked at my drive partitions in Disk Management, and have a question about two of them. The drive is a 1TB Samsung MVMe PM991a. The partition layout is:

Partition 1: EFI System Partition 150 MB

Drive C: Boot, Page File, Crash Dump, Basic Data Partition 934.11 GB

Unspecified Partition: 1.13 GB, no designation

Partition 5: Recovery Partition 16.99 GB

Partition 6: Recovery Partition, 1.37 GB

I have two questions:

1) What's with the unspecified partition, and can I use a drive manager to combine it with Drive C?

2) Is there a reason for two separate recovery partitions? If not, can I (or should I) combine them into one using a partition manager?

Thank you,

Terry

 

Replies (3)
6 Indium
189

I can't answer your answer.

I personally wouldn't stress over 1.13GB on a 1TB SSD , but it is your decision.

I would suggest backing up your SSD with Macrium Reflect Free before proceeding further.

 

182

I take your point about the space involved being trivial. I am, however, curious about how the apparently superfluous partitions came to be; to wit, is that the way Dell intended them to be. (They might have been created when I restored a backup after resetting Windows due to a problem downloading the August Windows update.) I suspect that the unspecified partition is a mistake, but I would like to hear from someone at Dell whether the two recovery partitions are there by design, hence that they shouldn't be combined.

146

I installed and ran EaseUS Partition Master (https://www.easeus.com/partition-manager/epm-free.html), which revealed that the unnamed mystery 1.13 GB partition is reserved for WinRE (Windows Recovery Environment---see https://techcommunity.microsoft.com/t5/windows-it-pro-blog/windows-recovery-environment-explained/ba...). I'd say it's a design flaw that this information doesn't appear in the Windows Disk Management app.

Still don't know what the two other recovery partitions are individually for, but that's more of academic than practical interest.

Terry

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