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Which connector to drive a 5120 x 1440 144 Hz Samsung CRG9

Hi,

I own a Dell XPS 15 9570 i9-8950HK CPU @ 2.90GHz, 32GB RAM, Nvidia 1050ti MaxQ. I'm wanting to buy a Super-Ultrawide monitor for Video Editing and some FPS gaming. I'm looking at the Samsung CRG9. It has no USB-C port.

Would it be a USB-C to Display Port to give me the highest resolution at the fastest refresh rate?

Eventually I'll get an e-GPU to run it but what would be the best connection to use natively from the laptop please?

CRG90 Monitor 

@jphughan Thanks in advance!

 

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7 Thorium

@DarrenStarrTV  Yes, a USB-C to DisplayPort cable is your best bet.  USB-C outputs DisplayPort anyway, so it's simpler than using a USB-C to HDMI 2.0 cable, which involves an active converter chip that just adds cost and complexity.  You'll be able to run that display at 5120x1440 60 Hz.  HDMI 2.0 should work too though if that would be easier, assuming that display's HDMI input supports HDMI 2.0.  The HDMI output on the XPS 15 9570 definitely does.  And you'd also need an HDMI cable specifically rated for HDMI 2.0.

However, be aware of this thread.  The post I wrote there that's marked as the answer basically notes that Intel apparently pushed out a driver in January 2020 that introduced a bug that broke 5120x1440 resolution.  The fix when I wrote that post was to roll back to a previous release in order to regain that resolution.  Intel may have released an even newer driver since then that resolves that bug, but I'm not sure since I don't have a 5120x1440 display to test with and I'm not following that topic closely -- but I linked to a thread on the Intel forums that might be worth following.  And yes, the Intel GPU driver matters here because all of the display outputs in the XPS 15 system are wired to the Intel GPU, not the NVIDIA GPU.  The NVIDIA GPU when active operates as a render-only device through NVIDIA Optimus, which is how most dual GPU systems on the market are designed.


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Replies (5)
7 Thorium

@DarrenStarrTV  Yes, a USB-C to DisplayPort cable is your best bet.  USB-C outputs DisplayPort anyway, so it's simpler than using a USB-C to HDMI 2.0 cable, which involves an active converter chip that just adds cost and complexity.  You'll be able to run that display at 5120x1440 60 Hz.  HDMI 2.0 should work too though if that would be easier, assuming that display's HDMI input supports HDMI 2.0.  The HDMI output on the XPS 15 9570 definitely does.  And you'd also need an HDMI cable specifically rated for HDMI 2.0.

However, be aware of this thread.  The post I wrote there that's marked as the answer basically notes that Intel apparently pushed out a driver in January 2020 that introduced a bug that broke 5120x1440 resolution.  The fix when I wrote that post was to roll back to a previous release in order to regain that resolution.  Intel may have released an even newer driver since then that resolves that bug, but I'm not sure since I don't have a 5120x1440 display to test with and I'm not following that topic closely -- but I linked to a thread on the Intel forums that might be worth following.  And yes, the Intel GPU driver matters here because all of the display outputs in the XPS 15 system are wired to the Intel GPU, not the NVIDIA GPU.  The NVIDIA GPU when active operates as a render-only device through NVIDIA Optimus, which is how most dual GPU systems on the market are designed.


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@jphughan Many, many thanks. You confirmed it for me. That is excellent. I read many posts answered by you and noticed you gave great and detailed answers. I gave kudos on them. Thank you for answering my question. Wishing you Health and Happiness. Darren.

@jphughan I've notice you been a great contributor to the community as well. I'm also in the process of receiving the Samsung CRG9 Super Ultrawide as a productivity and  ps4 gaming ( PBP Picture / 16:9) purpose. I will be docking a xps 9570. Since I will only be running one monitor CRG9 and two devices 9570/PS4 with wireless keyboard and mouse, do I need a docking station say wb19tb? Or just the single usbc to display port for the 9570 xps and the hdmi for the ps4? Any perspective would be appreciated. 

Hey@nsync512 , thanks for the kind words. Glad to help out where I can.

You don't need a docking station just to connect your system to your display.  You might WANT one in order to avoid having to separately connect/disconnect a video cable, power cable, possibly a USB cable if you have external peripherals or a hub, and possibly an audio cable if you have external speakers.  But that would be a convenience purchase rather than a necessity purchase.  If you did go that route, I would go with the WD19TB rather than the regular WD19 because with the regular WD19, you would only be able to run the display in PBP as a 2560x1440 "tile".  If you wanted to run 5120x1440, you would be limited to 30 Hz with a regular WD19.  A WD19TB would give you the option to run the entire 5120x1440 display area from your laptop at 60 Hz when you wanted to do so.

But if you want to at least start without a dock, then a USB-C to DP cable would allow you to run up to 5120x1440 60 Hz from your XPS 15 if you ever wanted to do that, and therefore would also allow 2560x1440 in PBP mode.  I think it would even allow 2560x1440 120 Hz in PBP mode, but I haven't tested that personally.  But you would not be able to run 5120x1440 120 Hz.  Looking over the display's documentation, it does support DisplayPort 1.4, which would allow that, but your system doesn't.  It MIGHT also support it by using dual DisplayPort 1.2 links from the source system, which you could potentially achieve using something like a Thunderbolt 3 to Dual DisplayPort adapter (or a dock), but Intel GPUs don't support DisplayPort link aggregation, which is the ability to use multiple interfaces to drive a single display.  They support DisplayPort MST, which is the ability to divide the bandwidth of a single interface across multiple independent displays, but that's the opposite of what you need.

The only way you could sort of achieve 5120x1440 120 Hz from your system would be using a dock or the type of adapter I just mentioned, setting your display to PBP mode for your two DP interfaces, and connecting both to your dock/adapter.  In that case, your system will think it's connected to two separate 2560x1440 120 Hz displays.  The catch with that is that when the system doesn't know that they're actually the same display, you can end up with some weird behavior.  For example, full screening an app will cause it to full screen only on half of the display.  And games that don't support multiple displays wouldn't work either.

As for the PS4, I'm not sure how that will go.  The display's documentation clearly indicates that it can run 2560x1440 60 Hz via HDMI (actually it can run 4K 60 Hz over HDMI), but I don't know if the PS4 itself supports that.  It looks like the PS4 Pro does, but I'm not sure about the regular PS4 since I haven't looked into it.  But I suppose you could always just set the PS4 to 1080p and the display will scale it up to 1440p.

Hopefully this wasn't way more information than you were looking for.  Good luck!


@jphughan  Very well put. I will start off with the usbc to display port first and perhaps wait on a good deal for the wd19tb docking station as upgrade later if needed.  I will see test if 2560x1440 120 Hz in PBP mode is possible and followup why you all. I'm not a big gamer so 120hz isn't all that important to me.  Thanks again. 

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