XPS

2 Bronze

XPS 15 9530 Swollen Battery Fiasco

Just to add my notebook to the seemingly endless stream of swollen battery XPS models. Exactly the same symptoms as reported elsewhere, swollen battery pushing touchpad proud.

Warranty ended 7 months ago and Dell wouldn't offer a hardware only warranty on renewal. Hmmm, wonder why ;)

As a Dell user for 15 years I resent their silence on this matter, it has been reported many times...

When an XPS catches fire / explodes / does some real damage there will be that corporate PR saying "Oh we didn't realise, we'll make sure it doesn't happen again"...

They do know about it. They are just choosing to do nothing about it. I expected more of them. Not much more, but more than this...

 

 

 

 

Longtime Dell User :)
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7 Thorium

The "why" is the same reason a 100,000 mile car extended warranty won't cover the brake pads - like the battery, they're a wear item.

Long before the battery explodes or catches fire, the system will be rendered unusable.  The fact is that batteries in newer systems can and do swell at end of life - Mac users have known about the problem for years;  this is hardly surprising given Apple was the first to use prismatic batteries without steel casings. 

Since you know the battery is bad, get rid of it NOW and replace it - before a $150 battery turns into a $1500 replacement system need.  

@ejn63 Thanks for the comment. 

My problem is not with an ageing battery needing replacing, that is normal. It is with the bloating that is not. If the battery is going to bloat and that is a known characteristic Dell can tell us, before it permanently wrecks a top-end notebook. I don't remember seeing that in the sales specification when I bought it  :Smile:

Assuming this feature has only come to light more recently :Stickouttongue: then Dell has enough software on my PC (incessantly asking me to buy stuff!) to put an announcement saying that ageing batteries in this model lose function and can bloat. The cost of a new battery is... That would be good service and might even increase battery sales for out of warranty boxes. Instead of which we see denial, silence - and Dell won't even sell you the battery! 

Also note that in the USA there is an unannounced replacement programme for these bloating batteries, even for those out of warranty. Look up swollen battery for XPS in this forum and you will find lots and lots of examples, all with the high Wh battery. They know there is a problem ;)

For a similar fault on the Macbook Pro Apple announced a recall and free replacement a few weeks back. It is not like an XPS is a "buy and bin" kind of notebook, it is designed to compete with Macbook. So at least meet Apples barely acceptable level of customer service too.

Finally, to follow your example, if a car had brake pads that went faulty with age a service announcement would have to be made. This is not the brake pads just wearing out, it is the brake pads going faulty over time.

This battery is going faulty over time but Dell finds it cheaper to not acknowledge the fault and handle cases by exception, mainly in their very litigious home market ;)

Having been an a Technical Manager for a PC company many years back I have a little insight into how these decisions used to get made and it doesn't look like it has changed much  :smileyfrustrated:

When there is a big-enough problem like this to cause a class-action in the USA, Dell and the other PC manufacturers will mature how they handle their recall situations...

Longtime Dell User :)

adding my XPS 9530 to this list. touchpad became weirdly uneasy and one side sticking up. one screw from the housing loosed itself. no warning from the software, the battery is functioning on a normal level, i can still work on battery for almost 2 hours. not getting hot either, just swelling the unit apart!  

The "why" is the same reason a 100,000 mile car extended warranty won't cover the brake pads - like the battery, they're a wear item.

Long before the battery explodes or catches fire, the system will be rendered unusable.  The fact is that batteries in newer systems can and do swell at end of life - Mac users have known about the problem for years;  this is hardly surprising given Apple was the first to use prismatic batteries without steel casings. 

Sorry, inflating batteries that damage the laptop cannot be considered normal. And you should not downplay the fire hazard; an inflated battery may not frequently explode or catch fire, but sometimes does and I think the risk is not an acceptable one. 

My point is that at the very first sign of swelling - and you WILL get warning it's happening, long before any damage occurs -- get rid of the battery.

If you consider the risk of explosion or fire unacceptable, then you render the whole issue moot - you won't use anything powered by a lithium battery -- since that risk is ALWAYS there.  It's one of the downsides of the technology.

 

@ejn63 The first warning was my touchpad divorcing itself at some speed from my notebook. Some warning!

And if there is a particular symptom I expect to be told about it. Not to have to Sherlock an answer - which is still not confirmed by Dell. As I said before, if I had bought a disposable notebook from a no-name company it would be entirely different.

Lithium? I have 2 phones on Lithium-X (ion/po/whatever) technology no problem. I have 2 tablets on Lithium-X technology, no problem. I have 2 notebooks on Lithium-X technology. 1 is fine. The other  is the Dell XPS.

Whether it is a design flaw, a manufacturing flaw, it is a flaw. I will not hazard a guess on the cause of this particular class of problems but do you remember the Dell/Sony 2006 battery problems?

It only got dealt with when one caught fire, rather publicly. That was manufacturing particulate fault maybe combined with design flaw. It cost Dell and Sony $500m between them and a couple of years in court in Canada defending a class action.

That wasn't a generic problem with Lithium-X, it was a particular design / manufacturing problem.

Google "Dell Battery Swelling" and you get 332000 hits. Refine that down to "Dell XPS battery swelling" and you still get 66000 hits.

I don't expect a "free lunch" for an old battery. But I do expect high quality information direct from the manufacturer.

There is a problem here that Dell is failing to address.

Longtime Dell User :)

My point is that at the very first sign of swelling - and you WILL get warning it's happening, long before any damage occurs -- get rid of the battery.

If you consider the risk of explosion or fire unacceptable, then you render the whole issue moot - you won't use anything powered by a lithium battery -- since that risk is ALWAYS there.  It's one of the downsides of the technology.

For protecting the laptop it is indeed a good idea to get a swollen battery out ASAP if one feels qualified, following certain precautions: discharging the battery slowly before starting, using personal protection, being extra careful not to make a puncture in case something gets stuck.

Risk is always there, but is increased with an inflated battery. Inflated batteries are known to catch fires on occasions. You shouldn't send one by mail without proper protection. This is by now well known to Dell, however it is not disclosed in the manuals, despite pages of all sorts of warnings there. And it is obvious that they handle inflated batteries inconsistently, from refusing replacement within warranty to replacing for free outside warranty. 

@samos1111 Thanks - I did extract my battery so the notebook is not going to burn my house down :)

But Dell won't sell a replacement through retail, so my options are third party. Yuck yuck yuck.

Longtime Dell User :)
2 Bronze

I was told it wasn't an issue by tech support! :Surprise:

@ejn63 It is clearly a manufacture defect -- not a "wear" issue. My laptop has had very light use and maybe 20-30+ charge cycles before the battery issue. Brake pads aren't designed to last only 30 times .

https://www.dell.com/community/XPS/Don-t-buy-Dell-9530-9550-Swollen-Battery-Fire-Hazard/m-p/6078683#...

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