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Last reply by 06-19-2018 Solved
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XPS 15 9560, Thunderbolt Port to connect Monitor

Can I use the Thunderbolt Port in my Dell XPS 15 9560 to connect a monitor? Will it me good for gaming?

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Yes.  There are a variety of options for doing that.  The ones you should avoid are docks that use DisplayLink chips, like the D6000, because those are a very bad choice for gaming for technical reasons.  But here are some options for connecting displays:

- USB-C to DisplayPort adapter/cable: Allows you to use a single DisplayPort 1.2 output, which can drive a single 4K 60 Hz display, dual 2560x1600 60 Hz displays, or up to 3x 1080p displays.  The system only supports 3 independent active displays total, fyi.

- USB-C to HDMI 2.0 adapter/cable: Allows you to run a single display up to 4K at 60 Hz, assuming the display itself supports that via its HDMI input, and not all 4K 60 Hz displays do.

- USB-C docking station (such as the WD15): This would only allow up to dual 1080p displays or a single 2560x1600 displays at 60 Hz, or a single 4K display only at 30 Hz, since now the USB-C port has to carry both display and USB data, which reduces available display bandwidth.  But obviously you get more connectivity with a dock than a simple cable/adapter, and you'd also be able to charge the system with this single cable.  If you get the WD15, you'll need the one with the 180W adapter.

- Thunderbolt 3 to Dual DisplayPort adapter: Allows you to use two DisplayPort 1.2 outputs, which means up to dual 4K 60 Hz displays or 3x 2560x1600 60 Hz displays (if you use DisplayPort daisy chaining).  If needed, you can connect active DisplayPort to HDMI/DVI/VGA adapters to this adapter, but not the less expensive and more common passive adapters.

- TB3 docking station (such as the TB16): Same display capabilities as above since you're now using Thunderbolt rather than USB-C and there's no "penalty" for carrying the other data at the same time like there is with USB-C.  If you get the TB16, you'd be able to use passive DisplayPort adapters if needed, and if you wanted to charge your system, you'd need the TB16 version with the 240W adapter.




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7 Thorium

Yes.  There are a variety of options for doing that.  The ones you should avoid are docks that use DisplayLink chips, like the D6000, because those are a very bad choice for gaming for technical reasons.  But here are some options for connecting displays:

- USB-C to DisplayPort adapter/cable: Allows you to use a single DisplayPort 1.2 output, which can drive a single 4K 60 Hz display, dual 2560x1600 60 Hz displays, or up to 3x 1080p displays.  The system only supports 3 independent active displays total, fyi.

- USB-C to HDMI 2.0 adapter/cable: Allows you to run a single display up to 4K at 60 Hz, assuming the display itself supports that via its HDMI input, and not all 4K 60 Hz displays do.

- USB-C docking station (such as the WD15): This would only allow up to dual 1080p displays or a single 2560x1600 displays at 60 Hz, or a single 4K display only at 30 Hz, since now the USB-C port has to carry both display and USB data, which reduces available display bandwidth.  But obviously you get more connectivity with a dock than a simple cable/adapter, and you'd also be able to charge the system with this single cable.  If you get the WD15, you'll need the one with the 180W adapter.

- Thunderbolt 3 to Dual DisplayPort adapter: Allows you to use two DisplayPort 1.2 outputs, which means up to dual 4K 60 Hz displays or 3x 2560x1600 60 Hz displays (if you use DisplayPort daisy chaining).  If needed, you can connect active DisplayPort to HDMI/DVI/VGA adapters to this adapter, but not the less expensive and more common passive adapters.

- TB3 docking station (such as the TB16): Same display capabilities as above since you're now using Thunderbolt rather than USB-C and there's no "penalty" for carrying the other data at the same time like there is with USB-C.  If you get the TB16, you'd be able to use passive DisplayPort adapters if needed, and if you wanted to charge your system, you'd need the TB16 version with the 240W adapter.




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