piotrp04
1 Copper

XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

Hello,

my 3-year-old XPS 13 9343 suffers from a serious case of battery swelling, the touch-pad and some of the buttons start behaving randomly and living on their own. The lid doesn't fully close any more and the screen is suffering.

What are my options to address this? I've read this is a more common problem with other models, so not sure what the policy is on mine?

This is my second XPS and I love it, but this situation is not what I expected from a quality product like this.

 

20180522_051338559_iOS.jpg20180522_051450468_iOS.jpg

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ejn63
4 Ruthenium

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

Get the battery out of the system immediately - and replace it when you can order one. 

At three years old, the battery has exceeded its design life by 30% or more - it's simply worn out.

 

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piotrp04
1 Copper

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling


@ejn63 wrote:

Get the battery out of the system immediately - and replace it when you can order one. 

At three years old, the battery has exceeded its design life by 30% or more - it's simply worn out.

 


A worn out battery has just less capacity, it shouldn't malform the casing, prevent the lid from being closed damaging the display and basically render the computer non-functional.... especially not in a top model and brand like Dell XPS.

I'm contacting Dell Support, as this is not something normal.

ejn63
4 Ruthenium

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

You can try - and see what they say - but in the meantime, get rid of the battery before it completely destroys the system (or causes a fire).

 

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piotrp04
1 Copper

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

Dell support did not recognize this as being a problem for my XPS 13 9343 model - of which I'm a living proof that it did happen.

I was offered a paid analysis to estimate the damage and get a quote for fixing it - which is perfectly fine for any damage I would cause ... but like I wrote above I do not agree that what happened is my fault nor something "normal" or "to be expected".

Anyway, with a heavy heart, I'm afraid this was my last XPS.

ejn63
4 Ruthenium

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

It won't matter if your next system is a Dell - or another brand.  They all have battery issues.

At the first sign of swelling (and it WILL happen), replace the battery IMMEDIATELY.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a5QUitX_qdU

https://missionrepair.wordpress.com/2015/03/13/macbook-pro-swollen-battery-its-not-a-myth/

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0Bw4C5-BS_BqNZXRYb1hfcEw3T00/view

https://community.acer.com/en/discussion/509881/acer-c720p-swollen-battery

 

 

I created this video with the YouTube Video Editor (http://www.youtube.com/editor)
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LXPS13
1 Copper

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

I have the same problem. My XPS 13 is less than 2 years old with extended warranty expiring only in early 2019. Dell support hesitating on replacing battery FOC saying battery is more than 1 year old and not covered by warranty. Battery is working fine but they claim it’s possibly bloated. Looks like a battery defect not due to usage. Should customer pay for this when I had paid $245 for the extended warranty of another year?

Hope this comes to the attention of DELL management.

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ejn63
4 Ruthenium

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

The answer is yes -  you are responsible for paying for a battery replacement.  The extended warranty does not cover the battery.

 

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samos1111
3 Silver

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

At three years old, the battery has exceeded its design life by 30% or more - it's simply worn out.

I can't believe you are defending this nonsense. Okay, the battery may be worn out (we've got no info on the actual number of cycles and other conditions except for the age though), but the laptop should give a warning and shut the battery off before it swells. 

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ejn63
4 Ruthenium

Re: XPS 13 9343 serious battery swelling

If there were a way to cut off the battery before it swells, it would have been done by now.  I can see any number of issues with trying to use a pressure sensor inside the system (the only practical way to do it), because notebooks are used anywhere from sea level to on submarines, to in the mountains to aircraft where ambient pressure varies. False alerts would be the result.

Apple's been using this type of case-less prismatic battery for the longest, and not surprisingly, had the swelling problem for the longest.  The degree to which these swell is directly related to how hard the batteries work, and the temperatures to which they're exposed.  You don't see as many swelling in cell phones, tablets or iPads as you do in notebook systems -- and the fact that every generation of notebook runs hotter than the last doesn't help.

Still, there's a reason why warranties generally don't cover batteries.  And while you can purchase a 3-year warranty on some business notebooks (Latitudes, Thinkpads, etc.) all you're doing in that case is pre-paying a replacement battery.  And it's almost universal that manufacturers reduce the capacity and slow the charging on batteries that carry longer warranties. 

The simple fact is that there's a downside to thin and light - that is, higher temperatures and swollen batteries.

If you don't want the spectre of a swollen battery, buy a system that still uses steel-cased cylindrical batteries.  Lenovo still uses these on the conventional (chunky) Thinkpads.  Many gaming system manufacturers (Clevo) do as well.  So does Tesla in the Model X and Model S.  They're also not thin and light.  And though the Model 3 uses a different cell, it's still steel-cased.

There's a reason why your car battery and cylindrical cells are vented -- and there's a big downside to prismatic cells that aren't.  Doesn't matter whose name is on the outside - chemistry is chemistry and batteries can produce hydrogen gas.  Give it nowhere to go - and they will swell.

 

 

 

 

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