seldenb's Posts

seldenb's Posts

FWIW, I had similar video problems with my E6510, Q720, FHD system, and also had the motherboard replaced to no avail. The graphics hangs and restarts all went away when I reinstalled Win7 Pro x64... See more...
FWIW, I had similar video problems with my E6510, Q720, FHD system, and also had the motherboard replaced to no avail. The graphics hangs and restarts all went away when I reinstalled Win7 Pro x64 from scratch, using the DVDs which were included with the system. The computer has been rock-stable ever since then (September, 2010). However, I installed only the two or three Dell drivers that I actually needed. In particular, I did not install the ethernet, Bluetooth, WiMax, fingerprint, multi-touch trackpad, RAID or Webcam drivers. Of course, you might need some of these. I also installed the most recent graphics driver from Nvidia instead of Dell's version, which was older.  I suspect that one (or perhaps interactions) of the non-video drivers intermittently causes long delays in interrupt handling, which is unacceptable to Win7's display software. I hope this helps a little.
A laptop will overheat if its air vents (input or output) are partially blocked or if it has collected dust internally. The inputs usually are on the bottom and the feet on the bottom often are ver... See more...
A laptop will overheat if its air vents (input or output) are partially blocked or if it has collected dust internally. The inputs usually are on the bottom and the feet on the bottom often are very short, so sitting it flat on a hard tabletop will reduce the available input air. Placing it on a soft (cloth) surface will restrict air flow more. Many people purchase a laptop platform which includes its own fans to increase the input air flow. All laptops gradually accumulate dust inside which restricts flow and makes them run hotter. You (or a repair shop) can open it up to clean it out. My laptop (E6510) typically runs at about 55 degrees C, and warms up to 72 degrees when running 3D programs.
3D design programs like Maya need high quality 3D graphics hardware and a fast CPU. Laptops which are that good do tend to be expensive. Double check the hardware requirements specified by the school... See more...
3D design programs like Maya need high quality 3D graphics hardware and a fast CPU. Laptops which are that good do tend to be expensive. Double check the hardware requirements specified by the school. Typical inexpensive desktop computers are not going to be good enough.
Overheating is one likely cause. That's often caused by accumulated dust inside, which you can clean out. Carefully! If you haven't already, you might consider installing a temperature monitoring p... See more...
Overheating is one likely cause. That's often caused by accumulated dust inside, which you can clean out. Carefully! If you haven't already, you might consider installing a temperature monitoring program. I use SpeedFan, but there are many others.  
The CPU throttling down when it gets overheated is one of Intel's intentional design features. The slower it runs, the less heat it generates. The CPU getting overheated is more likely to be a fail... See more...
The CPU throttling down when it gets overheated is one of Intel's intentional design features. The slower it runs, the less heat it generates. The CPU getting overheated is more likely to be a failure in your computer. My suspicion would be that the thermal coupling compound used to match the CPU to its heatsink was not properly applied. FWIW, when idling, my laptop's internal temperatures are around 50C or slightly lower. When busy and running 3D applications, it gets up into the low 70s. It never throttles due to overheating. (I have an E6510 with a Q720 CPU and Nvidia 3100M graphics)
Put your hand next to the outlet vent. There should be lots of warm air coming out of it, it'll get warmer when the computer is busy. possible causes of overheating: 1. air flow blocked -- make s... See more...
Put your hand next to the outlet vent. There should be lots of warm air coming out of it, it'll get warmer when the computer is busy. possible causes of overheating: 1. air flow blocked -- make sure both the intake and outlet vents aren't getting covered up. Use the laptop only on a hard, flat surface, not on a soft, cloth covered surface. Consider getting a specialized lap desk with built-in fan to help the airflow. 2. fan is turning loudly but not much air flow: dust has accumulated internally -- open laptop and clean it out carefully 3. fan is turning loudly and plenty of air flow, but the air isn't very warm: thermal coupling between cpu and heat sink is bad  -- send for repair 4. fan isn't turning properly --  send for repair I use SpeedFan to monitor all temperatures and fans.There are many similar programs available.   I hope these suggestions help a little.  
Try disabling ASF in the BIOS, and/or all network interfaces, wired and wireless. Of course, you'll need to re-enable the interfaces you actually need once you've found out which one is responsible. ... See more...
Try disabling ASF in the BIOS, and/or all network interfaces, wired and wireless. Of course, you'll need to re-enable the interfaces you actually need once you've found out which one is responsible. ASF 2.0 (Alert Specification Format v2) is a networked remote control facility. It includes power-on and -off commands.  It's designed to work whether or not an O/S is installed.  
Sandy-Bridge CPUs have a 2000-series model number: 23xx for i3, 25xx for i5, 27xx for i7.  To see what processor chip model you have, Right-Mouse-Button click on  "Computer " and select "Properties" ... See more...
Sandy-Bridge CPUs have a 2000-series model number: 23xx for i3, 25xx for i5, 27xx for i7.  To see what processor chip model you have, Right-Mouse-Button click on  "Computer " and select "Properties" in the popup menu. The mobile Sandy-Bridge chips have only been shipping to manufacturers since the beginning of this year (i.e. for only 4 weeks).  It will be a major advertising feature when systems actually start shipping to customers. You won't be getting one without knowing about it. Manufacturers will do a recall of affected systems. For more info, see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandy_Bridge
it may be taking forever trying to access network shares which are available at home but not at work. I suggest swapping the two docking stations. If the same docking station has the same performan... See more...
it may be taking forever trying to access network shares which are available at home but not at work. I suggest swapping the two docking stations. If the same docking station has the same performance, then the one which causes slow performance is defective in some way. If the laptop is still slow at work and fast at home, then the problem is caused by there being something different about the environment.  
Exactly what model of external display are you using? What graphics chipset is in the E6410? (Intel or Nvidia?) Most graphics drivers limit themselves to a maximum corresponding to the exact reso... See more...
Exactly what model of external display are you using? What graphics chipset is in the E6410? (Intel or Nvidia?) Most graphics drivers limit themselves to a maximum corresponding to the exact resolution of the display and won't try to output a higher resolution. Being able to handle "up to" a particular resolution often does not mean that the display actually has that many pixels. I found that more resolutions were available on my E6510 when I installed a more recent graphics driver downloaded from Nvidia instead of the Dell certified driver.
Apparently the resolution of your E6410's screen is only 1440x900. Unlike CRTs, LCD panels have a fixed resolution determined by how many transistors the manufacturer designed into them. Trying to ru... See more...
Apparently the resolution of your E6410's screen is only 1440x900. Unlike CRTs, LCD panels have a fixed resolution determined by how many transistors the manufacturer designed into them. Trying to run them at a higher resolution does no good because the additional pixels get merged together on the screen, making them even less readable than simply running the screen at its native resolution. If you want higher resolution than is provided by the laptop's screen, you'll need to buy a high resolution external display and connect it to the E6410's VGA output.
Exactly what problems are you having? What operating system are you running? XP, Vista, Win7, Linux? Please be specific about the contents of any error messages in popup windows. The problems c... See more...
Exactly what problems are you having? What operating system are you running? XP, Vista, Win7, Linux? Please be specific about the contents of any error messages in popup windows. The problems could be due to either software or hardware, which would have different solutions depending on the symptoms and the operating system.
Contact Dell for repairs if it's still in warranty. The motherboard probably will need to be replaced. It looks to me like a failure in the graphics circuitry -- either in its local memory or in it... See more...
Contact Dell for repairs if it's still in warranty. The motherboard probably will need to be replaced. It looks to me like a failure in the graphics circuitry -- either in its local memory or in its memory controller. The graphics diagnostics are quite limited, so it's not surprising they wouldn't detect the problem. In most cases, the graphics chipset is soldered to the motherboard, so the whole thing probably has to be swapped out.
You should investigate getting your laptop cleaned and inspected. I don't know how much would be covered by its warranty. Some laptops have been found to have very poor heat conductivity between th... See more...
You should investigate getting your laptop cleaned and inspected. I don't know how much would be covered by its warranty. Some laptops have been found to have very poor heat conductivity between the CPU or graphics chips and their heatsinks. Often they were found to have little or no thermal paste, or the paste had dried out and failed. At the very least, you should make sure you have a backup of the disk in case the system dies completely.
Argryo, Sadly, you need to assume the worst. There are different types of malware, but you must assume that all of your banking accounts, passwords, credit cards and anything else you've typed into... See more...
Argryo, Sadly, you need to assume the worst. There are different types of malware, but you must assume that all of your banking accounts, passwords, credit cards and anything else you've typed into your computer is now known to criminals who plan to steal whatever they can and run your cedit card charges up to the maximum. You need to use some other (clean) computer to change all of your passwords everywhere, and you need to contact your credit card issuers to get new cards issued. And do it soon. You should let your cousin know, too, just in case that message actually came from his computer, in which case it is infected, too. He wouldn't have known that the message was sent, since most such malware scans all the address books on a computer looking for email addresses and then sends plausible messages to them all.      
The "antiVirus" software is actually a virus. Well, 'trojan horse" is a more accurate description. since it pretends to be one thing and actually is something quite different. Try selecting the mo... See more...
The "antiVirus" software is actually a virus. Well, 'trojan horse" is a more accurate description. since it pretends to be one thing and actually is something quite different. Try selecting the most recent restore point from before this happened. A restore point should have been created each time you installed Windows updates .If activating a restore point does not return your computer to a good state, you'll have to reinstall Windows from scratch. Unfortunately, a complete reinstall really is the only safe thing to do. There's no way to know what the malware might have done to your computer, including damaging the restore points.  
The USB/eSATA socket is quite tight on my E6510 when used with a USB cable. Also, look closely when you plug in the cable to make sure it's properly aligned.
I suggest reinstalling Windows, but with only the device drivers for the hardware components that you actually need and use. My E6510 had daily video glitches until I reinstalled Win7 Pro X64 from sc... See more...
I suggest reinstalling Windows, but with only the device drivers for the hardware components that you actually need and use. My E6510 had daily video glitches until I reinstalled Win7 Pro X64 from scratch and left out the drivers for the devices that I wasn't actually using. E.g. I did not install the TCB, Bluetooth or eSATA Raid support, among other things, although i'm not suggesting that those particular drivers are at fault. I also made a point of explicitly disabling unused devices in the Windows device manager. It has been rock stable ever since, with firmware A05.  
The message you copied is from when the system came up again. I think the entry with the previous timestamp should say why the system went down.
The most reliable way to disable the webcam is to physically prevent it from seeing anything: cover it with tape, paint over it, or remove the lens.