iline's Posts

iline's Posts

I wish to put this issue out into the wilderness of the internet as a cautionary note - that it may be recorded and hopefully improved upon by the industrial designers at Dell. The brackets that sec... See more...
I wish to put this issue out into the wilderness of the internet as a cautionary note - that it may be recorded and hopefully improved upon by the industrial designers at Dell. The brackets that secure the screen hinge to the chassis of the computer are **bleep** into soft steel screwblocks. The metal frame that connects these screwblocks to the rest of the chassis is extremely thin sheet metal - less than a millimetre thick. This strip and the screwblocks  - a soft steel monocoque - are bonded to the carbon fibre palmrest with epoxy. Opening the computer screen requires force of 500g-1kg, and over three years, the stresses applied to this extremely thin piece of metal will cause catastrophic failure eventually. If you want to see for yourself, open the laptop up and locate the DC power inlet where the cable plugs in. The jack itself is glued to the carbon handrest, and the power cables run through a channel in the metal next to the screwblock. If you notice, the flexion in this region of the laptop caused by opening the screen means that mechanical force is being applied to the two screws holding the back cover on - the two corner screws on the hinge side of the computer. Ultimately these two screws are providing backup strength to the screwblocks. The channel through which the power cable runs is totally unnecessary - there is clearance enough for the 2mm cable if that channel never existed - and if the screwblock were reinforced all the way down to the motherboard, I'd wager it would probably not suffer metal fatigue. So, what can you do as the proud owner of a computer doomed to fail mechanically? Epoxy resin (Milliput, Gorilla etc) can be used to fill in the gaps between the screwblock and the carbon walls of the palmrest. The channel the power cable runs through should be filled in. If I was the industrial designer, I would have put in an X-shaped brace into the metalwork where that stupid cable run is now. Both hardpoints for attaching the screen suffer a lot of flex, and both sides need reinforcing, in my opinion. Dell - yes carbon is strong but it is flexible, don't glue 0.6mm soft steel to it thinking that cumulative forces won't eventually snap the metal!
I appreciate that Dell has put a Max-Q GPU and a six-core CPU in the same form factor as the 9550; these are both components with a significantly higher power draw and heat output than the i7/960M th... See more...
I appreciate that Dell has put a Max-Q GPU and a six-core CPU in the same form factor as the 9550; these are both components with a significantly higher power draw and heat output than the i7/960M the case was originally designed for. I applied the registry edit that pertained to SSD drives causing 100% load at idle - still the fan noise persisted. I have a suspicion that an uneven load on the CPU may be caused by the onboard graphics - I will test whether low-load on the discrete GPU resolves the matter, but I'm not extremely hopeful, especially if my first statement proves correct.
So, I did this with my XPS 15 9550 and my brand-new 9570. Opened the Dell box, took out my unused laptop and immediately got the backplate off with a Torx driver. Swapped out the tiny crappy mSat... See more...
So, I did this with my XPS 15 9550 and my brand-new 9570. Opened the Dell box, took out my unused laptop and immediately got the backplate off with a Torx driver. Swapped out the tiny crappy mSata and replaced it with a brand-new M.2 - formatted to NTFS, GPT Bought and updated win product key with  OEM win 10 Pro key - otherwise say goodbye to networking I got the partitioning wrong so many times, but at this point I switched to AHCI Win 10 thankfully contains all the SSD optimisations that Win 7 lacked, but there's always firmware and drivers to grab off the Dell product support page. This all worked incredibly smoothly. In fact, the smoothest setup of any PC I've owned in thirty years. The one thing I didn't do was update the BIOS - yes there is a failsafe partition for BIOS in case of corruption, but three people I know on Twitter bricked their machines during install. Hopefully the BIOS update has been fixed, but I am aware I'm being superstitious rather than scientific.  
@Mohinder1971You are a legend! Thank you sir!
I'm also trying to do this. I am cloning my old hard drive to a new 2.5" SSD and have used its caddy (I had a 9550) and the 56wh battery (which is thankfully only a few months old). I hope that th... See more...
I'm also trying to do this. I am cloning my old hard drive to a new 2.5" SSD and have used its caddy (I had a 9550) and the 56wh battery (which is thankfully only a few months old). I hope that the XPS 15 isn't limited in this way, because they have kept the same chassis and SATA HDD port in the newer 9570 model. I will try to reset the battery sensor as described in the ncconsumer.org article, but failing that, I would like to ask Dell directly why they have deprecated support for 56wh batteries (the internal 2.5" and SATA port work as expected).    
I can confirm that enabling "USB Wake-Up Support" works. The computer needs a tap on the power button to wake, but does so immediately and responsively, unlike before.