rotational's Posts

rotational's Posts

As per Eimy's table above, you have two 2280 sockets and a 2260 socket.  All sockets support both SATA and NVMe mode; I am using a Samsung 960 EVO stick in NVMe mode as the only internal drive in... See more...
As per Eimy's table above, you have two 2280 sockets and a 2260 socket.  All sockets support both SATA and NVMe mode; I am using a Samsung 960 EVO stick in NVMe mode as the only internal drive in my 17 R4, and it's most excellent.
Here is Killer's Linux support page: Linux  It looks like if you are using a recent Debian-based distro, the drivers should already be included in the kernel.  Otherwise, a little more work... See more...
Here is Killer's Linux support page: Linux  It looks like if you are using a recent Debian-based distro, the drivers should already be included in the kernel.  Otherwise, a little more work may be required.
It's not a bad idea for you to wipe that machine and start clean.  It's not difficult to do if you are patient and careful. You can create your own USB installation stick using this tool: D... See more...
It's not a bad idea for you to wipe that machine and start clean.  It's not difficult to do if you are patient and careful. You can create your own USB installation stick using this tool: Download Windows 10  Your license key is associated to the machine in the BIOS and you will not need to enter one during Windows install.  Windows will also activate automatically once you are back online. Before you begin, you will also want to download all of the Dell drivers and software for that machine to a separate USB stick.  Just go to Dell's main support page and enter the machine's Service Tag.  If you can't find the service tag, you can browse to your specific model laptop, but be aware that it will offer you drivers for hardware that you might not have that way.  I would suggest going into your Device Manager and using that to determine exactly which hardware you have so that you download the correct drivers.  Remember to back up any pictures/documents/etc. before you start. Just boot to the USB stick and do a Custom/Advanced install.  When you are asked to choose where to install windows, you'll most likely see three or four partitions on the main hard drive.  Delete all of them, and then select the empty drive and tell Windows to install there.  That will allow Windows to partition the drive properly.  Note if you have more than one hard drive installed, make sure you know which one is which before you delete anything!  From this point on it's mostly automated.  Once Windows is installed, install your Dell drivers and Software.  Also make sure to run Windows update. Compare your Device Manager to the one before you started - is everything there?  Are there any alert icons or Unknown Devices? Are all the Alienware "extras" working?  Make sure you've installed all of the Alienware applications from the support page and that everything works - lights, etc. Don't spend time installing a bunch of apps and games until you are satisfied that the machine is configured completely and you are happy with it!
No worries!  Bear in mind that M.2 is just the physical form factor; M.2 SSDs come in both SATA and NMVe flavors.  If/when you do look to upgrade, your 17 R4 will support the faster NVMe drives! ... See more...
No worries!  Bear in mind that M.2 is just the physical form factor; M.2 SSDs come in both SATA and NMVe flavors.  If/when you do look to upgrade, your 17 R4 will support the faster NVMe drives!  The performance difference here is just much smaller than between a SATA spinning disk and SATA SSD - but still noticeable. Your Sandisk X400 is SATA, not NVMe.  I would not suggest running out and replacing it just for the performance boost though.  If/when you feel like you need more storage space, it would be worthwhile to consider replacing it outright with a large NMVe stick instead of just adding an additional drive - you'll get the most benefit when having the operating system live and work on the fastest storage possible, much more so than when using one as just a storage or games drive.
If you have no other drives in the system, then yes generally should only have to physically install the drive and the machine will see it and present it to the operating system.  If you will hav... See more...
If you have no other drives in the system, then yes generally should only have to physically install the drive and the machine will see it and present it to the operating system.  If you will have additional drives in the system, you'll need to enter the BIOS and make sure the NVMe stick is the first boot option if you want to install Windows there and have it be your primary system drive. Also make sure your controller is in AHCI mode in the BIOS, unless you specifically need/want to create a RAID array. You'll also need to install the Samsung NVMe driver (available from their website) after Windows installation is complete.  The Magician software is optional but useful. Performance wise, going from SATA SSD to NVMe SSD is a much smaller jump than a spinning disk drive to a SATA SSD, but it is noticeable to me and definitely impressively fast.
Yes, I also have a 17 R4 and am using the below Samsung 960 NVMe stick.  It is running at PCIe Gen3 x4. Amazon.com: Samsung 960 EVO Series - 250GB PCIe NVMe - M.2 Internal SSD (MZ-V6E250BW): C... See more...
Yes, I also have a 17 R4 and am using the below Samsung 960 NVMe stick.  It is running at PCIe Gen3 x4. Amazon.com: Samsung 960 EVO Series - 250GB PCIe NVMe - M.2 Internal SSD (MZ-V6E250BW): Computers & Accessories  I believe both M.2 sockets support PCIe actually, but I can't remember which one I used
The Intel 7260 card I linked is absolutely compatible with Win10, don't worry!
1. I use CCleaner regularly on a few machines, primarily in conjunction with Windows Disk Cleanup to get the garbage off the system drive.  Their registry cleaner has never caused me any problems but... See more...
1. I use CCleaner regularly on a few machines, primarily in conjunction with Windows Disk Cleanup to get the garbage off the system drive.  Their registry cleaner has never caused me any problems but in reality it's almost never actually necessary. 2. If the new BIOS does not resolve an issue you are actually experiencing (check the release notes), then generally speaking I would not upgrade. 3. In my experience updating using the Intel network software directly from Intel is safe, however it's usually unnecessary.  Unless you have a very new NIC (wired or wireless), you are probably already running the latest available driver.  Check here to see if there's actually a driver update for your NIC in the latest package or not.  It's for Wireless only, I can't find one for wired: www.intel.com/.../000005559.html e.g. for the 2230 card, driver 15.18.0.1 is the latest that supports it,  even though the absolute newest driver is 19.50.1.5.  The actual Proset package version doesn't matter. You likely don't need any of the advanced services stuff in the Intel Wireless Proset downloader, so if you already have the latest driver, there's no need to install.  If your card is not listed, it's no longer supported and you definitely have the latest driver from Windows Update. For wired, again unless it's a very new card Windows Update should give you the latest driver.  You do not need the Proset software unless you're intending to do advanced configuration with VLANs, teaming, etc. If you do decide to update, make sure you that you download the latest versions of the Dell-supplied drivers ahead of time in case you need them.  I sincerely doubt there is any value in messing with a wired NIC, but I have seen wireless drivers resolve problems with certain kinds of access points and security protocols on older cards.  If you aren't having any actual problems with networking, it's probably best to leave well enough alone, but I think this is handy information to have if you do run into any issues.
Hi there, I checked your laptop specs and Windows 10 will have your initial SATA driver already (in old versions of Windows when installing, you would have to hit F6 when prompted for a disk contro... See more...
Hi there, I checked your laptop specs and Windows 10 will have your initial SATA driver already (in old versions of Windows when installing, you would have to hit F6 when prompted for a disk controller driver...Intel still calls it the "F6" driver haha).  So you don't have to worry about that...Just creating the stick with the MCT will be all you need to install successfully.  Install the Intel RST and your other drivers from Dell's website as normal after installing.
For the Alienware 17 R4 (I have one as well), if your USB stick is not showing up in the F12 menu and you have not disabled USB booting for UEFI in the BIOS, then there is likely a problem with your ... See more...
For the Alienware 17 R4 (I have one as well), if your USB stick is not showing up in the F12 menu and you have not disabled USB booting for UEFI in the BIOS, then there is likely a problem with your USB stick. I would suggest re-creating it using the Microsoft MCT located here: www.microsoft.com/.../windows10 If you continue to have problems I'd suggest the Alienware-specific forum here: community.dell.com/.../forum
There is most likely a hardware defect with that system, and I would highly suggest returning it for a refund and purchasing something else - assuming that is an option!
My experience with those built-in SD card readers is hit and miss and tends to be card-specific.  If you continue to have trouble I would highly recommend one of these, so far it has worked with ever... See more...
My experience with those built-in SD card readers is hit and miss and tends to be card-specific.  If you continue to have trouble I would highly recommend one of these, so far it has worked with every kind of SD card I've thrown at it. www.amazon.com/.../
1. In my experience, the initial formatting of the USB drive is not relevant.  I've never paid close attention to whether the drive was FAT32 or NTFS before using the MS Media Creation Tool, and have... See more...
1. In my experience, the initial formatting of the USB drive is not relevant.  I've never paid close attention to whether the drive was FAT32 or NTFS before using the MS Media Creation Tool, and have never had an issue with either standard BIOS or UEFI systems.  That said my sticks are normally formatted NTFS.  The MCT should re-format and partition the stick appropriately. Secure Boot will not be an issue (enabled).  If you are unsure about the state of the BIOS, do a factory reset on the BIOS settings and then go through and tweak them to your liking.  Make sure your SATA controller is in the correct/preferred mode (AHCI/RAID) before you install Windows. I've used Rufus for Windows as well, in which case you'll need to explicitly choose GPT partitioning if you are installing on a UEFI system.  I did not have success using the "MBR for BIOS/UEFI" option on a UEFI system with large drives. 2. Yes, in fact I used my Win10 install stick to fix some corrupted file permissions just last week. I'd suggest having the latest "F6" driver available on the USB stick during Windows install (most likely Intel Rapid Storage Technology).  I'd also suggest that during the Windows, after loading the Intel RST F6 driver, to delete any existing partitions on your system disk and then install Windows to the empty drive.  That will allow Windows to correctly partition out the disk for you. Good luck!
This is a shot in the dark as I haven't used iTunes in some time, but you can try installing DirectX 9 - I would not be surprised if Apple has not updated: Download DirectX End-User Runtime We... See more...
This is a shot in the dark as I haven't used iTunes in some time, but you can try installing DirectX 9 - I would not be surprised if Apple has not updated: Download DirectX End-User Runtime Web Installer from Official Microsoft Download Center 
I had the same exact problem with a 2230 card in another brand laptop.  I replaced it with an Intel Wireless-AC 7260 and was extremely pleased.  You should be able to find it for less than $30 (I got... See more...
I had the same exact problem with a 2230 card in another brand laptop.  I replaced it with an Intel Wireless-AC 7260 and was extremely pleased.  You should be able to find it for less than $30 (I got mine from Amazon). www.amazon.com/.../ Consult the service manual for your laptop for instructions on replacing the card, it's generally not difficult.  Check before you buy to make sure you're comfortable doing the work.  Download the latest driver package from Intel before removing the 2230 so that you have it available.  Also be sure to uninstall any existing Intel Wifi driver and software before shutting down to do the card swap.  I believe Win10 will recognize the card automatically, but be sure to install the Intel driver package (you don't need any of the Advanced services stuff).
Hey, thank you for this.  It's happened again a few times but very infrequently since my last update.  I looked and found that I had not installed the Tobii software, so I went ahead and loaded i... See more...
Hey, thank you for this.  It's happened again a few times but very infrequently since my last update.  I looked and found that I had not installed the Tobii software, so I went ahead and loaded it and then explicitly disabled it from within the application.  Hopefully this is the ticket. Thanks!
As long as you have a valid Win10 license (either by purchasing Win10 or previously upgrading from Win7/8 while it was free) you can and should skip Win7 and install Win10 cleanly.  You will not ... See more...
As long as you have a valid Win10 license (either by purchasing Win10 or previously upgrading from Win7/8 while it was free) you can and should skip Win7 and install Win10 cleanly.  You will not need a CD key as it's baked into the machine. Start here for a clean install of Windows 10: Download Windows 10 
The problem unfortunately did happen again, but only once in the last 48 hours.  The machine was idle at the time.  Since I generally use an external mouse and this seems to almost certainly be a... See more...
The problem unfortunately did happen again, but only once in the last 48 hours.  The machine was idle at the time.  Since I generally use an external mouse and this seems to almost certainly be a driver problem I'm going to just sit tight and hope for some love in a later revision. Rodrigo, this specific model touchpad has the ACPI Hardware ID "DLL0773", and again this is driver revision  19.2.17.45-A07. EDIT: I forgot to mention that as far as I can tell, the palm rejection option and the "zigzag to activate touchpad" options don't actually seem to do anything.  The touchpad is always active regardless of the zigzag setting, and if the palm rejection is working, it's so poor as to be useless. Thanks!
So a bit after posting originally and doing some more research, I ran across multiple references to disabling the Zoom gesture to correct input problems.  I reloaded the driver (this time allowin... See more...
So a bit after posting originally and doing some more research, I ran across multiple references to disabling the Zoom gesture to correct input problems.  I reloaded the driver (this time allowing Windows to automatically install the driver - I received the same version and control panel app as the Dell package) and disabled the Zoom gesture.  So far, so good after a couple of hours of work. The palm detection is one of my suspicions as well, if the problem happens again with Zoom off, I will re-enable it and start messing with the palm detection. If the notification area icon's graphic is representative, the phantom input appears pretty much centered on the pad.  Visually there's nothing to indicate any sort of installation defect or other physical problem, and the pad otherwise works perfectly. Thanks!
I'd immediately back up any important data you have on that drive to a USB stick/external drive.  It sounds like that drive is failing.  Do yourself a favor and replace it with an SSD!