Scratch101's Posts

Scratch101's Posts

I think it's important to remember that the dual CPU set up is fairly complicated. If everything's not perfect it just won't work. You can read about my personal experiences with this here: en.commun... See more...
I think it's important to remember that the dual CPU set up is fairly complicated. If everything's not perfect it just won't work. You can read about my personal experiences with this here: en.community.dell.com/.../21016701 It's a hard nut to crack honestly because there's a number of things that it could legitimately be. For me, in spite of the fact that I swapped CPUs and it booted and ran with both there was one that's very slightly damaged and so it was no longer a perfect match. Let me make this clear, my CPU was NOT dead . Just very slightly broken and therefore a mismatch. It wasn't badly broken as I ran for some time with each of them individually with no issues at all, but it seems that it doesn't take much, just a little bit of damage to throw the Pb7 error code.
Well, my issue has been resolved. I spoke with a friend whose thoughts I trust in computer matters. She suggested that, in spite of the fact that the computer will boot with both CPUs in individual... See more...
Well, my issue has been resolved. I spoke with a friend whose thoughts I trust in computer matters. She suggested that, in spite of the fact that the computer will boot with both CPUs in individually, there could be an issue that would make them not match. She pointed me to a thread (which, for whatever reason, I can no longer find) where someone else described exactly what she had suggested. I wanted to follow through but was delayed due to health issues. I recently ordered the replacement CPUs (I decided to upgrade while I was at it) and everything is working swimmingly now. So folks who get this message please note that you can run an individual CPU (and you can swap them as I did) and still have things work fine but together they will fail and give this message every time. That means something small is busted in the CPU itself. It's not preventing it from booting but it prevents them from matching perfectly so that they will no longer run together. I have to admit, I was surprised at this since CPUs are normally the last thing to go bad in a computer but it can and does happen. Anyone who's having problems like I was (17RSE, for example) this may well be your problem.
I'm sure that the riser board was connected correctly when this originally occured and I'm sure it is now. As for the RAM I learned my lesson on that  after my first install of the riser board. For t... See more...
I'm sure that the riser board was connected correctly when this originally occured and I'm sure it is now. As for the RAM I learned my lesson on that  after my first install of the riser board. For that it gave me a little message saying that the RAM configuration is sub-optimal so I learned quickly there. As for seating the Riser board properly, I saw damaged pins on riser boards online before I purchased mine so when mine arrived I was (and have been) quite careful when installing it. That said, it had been running for years when I first started getting this error code with both CPUs.
I apologize for not making this clearer to begin with. I did attempt to but I've done so much This issue arose when I was testing Linux and having a difficult time installing it. I did discover the... See more...
I apologize for not making this clearer to begin with. I did attempt to but I've done so much This issue arose when I was testing Linux and having a difficult time installing it. I did discover the problem with Linux was an unrelated SATA card. That was just testing as I wanted to move to Linux for certain things. I was running the same install of Windows 7 when the issue first happened but it doesn't matter since it acts the same under Windows 10. In short - it won't boot with any OS when both CPUs are installed but it will boot to whatever I want with one CPU. I have now tried clearing the Bios, it had the same result...I get the Pb7 error when I attempt to boot with both CPUs but it boots and runs fine with a single CPU. This has happened with 2 different motherboards so I'm guessing that the issue has nothing to do with the motherboard or the Bios. That said I still have no clue what the issue might be.
As I mentioned, I did replace the motherboard (in fact that's the first thing I replaced) and it has the same problem as before. In fact the only things I didn't replace are  the CPUs and the RAM. I ... See more...
As I mentioned, I did replace the motherboard (in fact that's the first thing I replaced) and it has the same problem as before. In fact the only things I didn't replace are  the CPUs and the RAM. I suppose it is possible that the board I purchased is also bad in the same way but I find that less than likely. There must be something else...something that I haven't replaced or something that I'm missing. I'm not sure what that would be at this point, though. Again, I have replaced the motherboard, riserboard, and power supply. It boots/runs fine with no riserboard in all instances. What am I missing?
I guess it depends on how much of a sleeper you're looking for. I don't think you'll find any PC from 1998 that will run well enough to really keep up with things today. On the other hand, you can ge... See more...
I guess it depends on how much of a sleeper you're looking for. I don't think you'll find any PC from 1998 that will run well enough to really keep up with things today. On the other hand, you can get some computers from 2006 that will run in a modern environment. I'm running a Dimension E520 from 2006 that originally had a painfully slow Pentium D and 2GB of RAM. It wasn't free, though...it was $15. It's currently running a QX6800 Extreme and 6GB of RAM (it can run 8GB) . I've seen Dimension E520s that were running P4s so going to a quad core is quite a jump in performance. I've heard that they can be overclocked as well but I've never bothered. That's one of the best examples that I know of for improving performance with simple upgrades. Many (probably most) boards are locked to CPUs that have a more limited range of performance than that, though. I've taken trashed/unwanted laptops and desktops and put them into service, though if you can't upgrade to at least a dual core CPU it's hardly worth spending much time or money on in my opinion. That said people trash lots of things that are extremely useful. My current primary laptop is one that I pulled from the trash. It's running an i7 with 16GB of RAM (that's what it had when it was thrown away). People are nuts and if you keep looking you may get lucky too. Be aware though, some older computers may need work. My E520 had 4 capacitors that needed replacing on the motherboard.
I've had and loved my Precision T7500 for years now, unfortunately I have an issue that, no matter what I do, I can't seem to get rid of. Here's the story. About a month ago I was attempting to in... See more...
I've had and loved my Precision T7500 for years now, unfortunately I have an issue that, no matter what I do, I can't seem to get rid of. Here's the story. About a month ago I was attempting to install Linux on it and I was having difficulty (I later discovered the issue there was a SATA card that's not Linux compatible). As I tried different versions of Linux and they kept failing I needed to restart quite a bit. As I did, I noticed one time I got what I would later come to realize is a Pb7 Code  (http://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/4/SLN288786/precision-t3500-t5500-t7500-workstations-diagnostic-lights-and-beep-codes?lang=EN). I continued to work on this for maybe another hour, then I got the Pb7 code and it wouldn't go away. I started to panic a bit and I began disconnecting Hard Drives until I had just the system drive connected. That changed nothing. I removed all my PCI-e cards which also changed nothing. Then I reconnected the cards and went searching for answers. Based on what I read I thought that maybe I damaged my system board, so I purchased one. Once installed, I got the same error code. I then decided to pull the riser board (which I hadn't done until that point) and it booted immediately. Based on that I did additional testing. I put all the RAM on the motherboard and it booted just fine. I then swapped CPUs and it booted fine. I assumed that this meant that the Riser board was damaged so I replaced it and repopulated everything correctly. When booted I got the same Pb7 message. I then assumed that my power supply was bad, so I replaced it. That also did nothing. I did an extended Memtest check on my full set of RAM and it passed. That brings me to where I am now which is to say, very confused. I want my computer back and running at full speed but I don't really want to spend more money on it without getting input about what the issue might be. It runs fine with 1 CPU, but always fails with the mentioned code when the riser board/second CPU's installed. I'd greatly appreciate any thoughts or suggestions. For the record, my system specs are as follows: Before the problem I had 2x Xeon 5675 and 12 GB RAM with EVGA Geforce GT 750. I'm currently running half of that, so a single 5675 and 6 GB RAM.