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Get the performance you paid for! Before installing your new TV, protect it against damage and performance distortion with either a Surge Suppressor or a UPS System. Without power protection, TVs are at the mercy of damaging power surges, line noise distortion and blackouts on the utility power line and signal lines.

OverviewGlossary

Alternating Current (AC)
Utility-supplied power accessed through power outlets.

Amp
A unit of measure for electrical current which refers to the amount of electricity per second flowing through a wire.

Blackout
A blackout, or power failure, is a complete loss of AC line voltage that can last for several seconds or go on for several days. Blackouts cause viewing and recording disruptions, and they can also cause potential damage to receivers and recorders due to incorrect turn-on sequencing when power is restored. UPS Systems support TVs and components through blackouts.

Brownout
A brownout, or undervoltage, is a partial loss of AC line voltage, usually below 103V. Brownouts can cause TVs and components to turn off if the voltage is too low. In addition they can distort TV video performance, especially with plasma TVs. Over time, brownouts can also cause slow electronic degradation. UPS Systems safely support TVs and components through brownouts.

Ground
The third prong on any wall receptacle connected to safety ground, where energy is discharged in emergency conditions.

Hertz (Hz)
The frequency of alternating cycles per second in an AC waveform. North American utility power is provided at 60Hz. In Europe and most of the rest of the world, utility power is provided at 50Hz.

Joule
Joule ratings measure a surge suppressor's ability to handle surges: more joules mean more protection.

Line Noise Interference (EMI/RFI)
Line noise refers to random fluctuations or electrical impulses that are carried along with standard AC current. Line noise is categorized as Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) and Radio Frequency Interference (RFI). Line noise (generated by radio transmissions, fluorescent lighting and appliances) distorts TV and component audio/video performance. Select Surge Suppressors and UPS Systems protect against line noise interference.

Overvoltage
A partial increase of AC line voltage, usually over 132V. Overvoltages can cause TVs and components to turn off if the voltage is too high. They can also cause slow electronic degradation. UPS Systems protect TVs and components against overvoltages.

Surge
A brief increase in the voltage that powers home theater components. Surges are caused by lightning strikes or utility company power distribution problems. Surges not only travel on the AC utility line but every line that connects TVs and home theater systems to the outside world, including coaxial, antenna, satellite, phone and network lines. Depending on the severity of the surge, it can cause a TV or component to reset or can cause catastrophic, irreparable damage. Surge Suppressors and UPS Systems both provide protection against surge damage.

Surge Suppressor
Surge Suppressors lengthen the life span of your TV and other components by stopping damaging surges caused by lightning strikes and utility company power distribution problems. While all surge suppressors provide some level of surge protection, only select models provide line noise filtering. Line noise filtering improves your Dell TV's audio/video performance by removing distortion (generated by radio transmissions, fluorescent lighting and appliances) on the AC and signal lines.

UPS System
UPS Systems include all of the features of a Surge Suppressor with the addition of battery backup support. Battery backup preserves receiver recorder settings by supporting components through blackouts and brownouts (low voltage). UPS Systems also enhance TV and component performance and lengthen component life spans by filtering disruptive line noise and stopping damaging surges.

VA (Volt Amps)
The amount of theoretical current used by a particular load. VA = volts x amps. For example, if a piece of 120V equipment is rated at 3 amps, its VA rating is 360 (120 x 3). Most UPS Systems are rated in VA. Actual wattage is typically 60 to 70 percent of this figure.

Volt
A unit of measure for voltage, which is electrical pressure that forces current to flow in a conductor, such as a wire.

Watt
A unit of measure for true power consumption.


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