Inspiron Desktops

Last reply by 08-11-2022 Solved
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Inspiron 3670 - making boot order changes in bios permanent

Hi

I have installed a 500GB SSD in my Inspiron planning to use this as the boot drive and keep the standard 1TB HDD as storage. I have cloned the HDD to the SSD and successfully booted from it. I have not re-formatted the HDD and would prefer to avoid doing that. 

In bios setup I can uncheck the (Toshiba) hard drive in the boot sequence and the machine will boot from the SSD and let me access the HDD. However, it does not remember this setting so the next time I restart it reverts to booting from the HDD. I think I have saved the setting. I have also tried saving it as a 'custom set up'

So far neither seems to keep this configuration between restarts. Am I missing something simple here? Help would be most welcome. And, while trying to research this, I couldn't find any detailed description of the Bios settings (there's a bit in the manual but it's sketchy). Anyone know if a more detailed treatment is available anywhere?

 

Thanks

Solution (1)

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10 Diamond
3052

Bios is not a boot commander and this is not INT13 MBR its UEFI GPT.

This is one of the many reasons why CLONING is not supported by Dell or Microsoft.

microsoft policy for disk duplication of windows installations

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/314828/

 

 

 


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Replies (10)
10 Diamond
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Windows Boot Manager controls which drive is the boot drive.

You will have to initialize the HDD, which removes all files, if you want to keep the HDD for storage. So make sure your personal files are backed up elsewhere.

How did you confirm PC boots from new SSD? Was HDD disconnected from motherboard?

Assuming PC boots OK from the SSD. Connect the HDD to motherboard and power PC on. Start tapping F12 when you see the Dell splash screen. When the F12 menu opens, look for the option to boot from the SSD on that menu.

After PC boots to the desktop from SSD, launch Disk Manager in Win 10 and initialize the HDD. (Repeat: all files will be deleted from the HDD.)

After the HDD is initialized with Disk Manager, restart normally. PC should boot from SSD and the HDD can now be used for storage.

EDITED

Ron

   Forum Member since 2004
   I'm not a Dell employee

10 Diamond
3053

Bios is not a boot commander and this is not INT13 MBR its UEFI GPT.

This is one of the many reasons why CLONING is not supported by Dell or Microsoft.

microsoft policy for disk duplication of windows installations

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/314828/

 

 

 


Report Unresolved Customer Service Issues
here

I do not work for Dell. I too am a user.

The forum is primarily user to user, with Dell employees moderating
Contact USA Technical Support


Get Support on Twitter @DellCaresPro


Diagnostics & Tools

3027

Well, there were a few clues:

  1. the PC booted much faster from the SSD than the HDD
  2. file manager reported the SSD as drive C:
  3. I first booted with the HDD disconnected

As i said in my original post, the device boots from the SDD providing I tell it to each time in the Bios.My question was 'how do I make this permanent' not 'how do I use the HDD as a data drive'. I *know* how to reformat the HDD but I am trying to avoid doing that - which I also said in my first post.

Are you saying this is not possible?

3019

@OneMoreONe  - As I already said, as long as the HDD has the OS on it, the PC is going to boot from that drive, not from the SSD.

If you don't want to format the HDD, you'll have to press F12 every time to boot from the SSD.

Your choice...

 

Ron

   Forum Member since 2004
   I'm not a Dell employee

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2 Bronze
2989

In "Boot sequence", your SSD needs to be listed first.  The Windows Boot Manager entry refers to your original Windows install and should not be first.

I don't know about an SSD but the above works with an NVME drive.  I did not have to nuke my original install on the HDD and can still boot to it via F12 if I wish.

 

 

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IVE clone m to my new ssd and removed the harddrive  and replaced it with the ssd i just cloned  works perfectly u cant use 2 hdd  and ssd at boot up  unless u hit F12  and u pick what 1 u want for instands i put 2 SSD  1 with primeos (androind OS for pcs) and windows 10 on the 2nd SSD  once i hit F12  it let me choose what OS i want  u can always keep your Hdd put in safe place but 4 storage u have to ease it or get anther SSD  and put in  USB device thats what i do i neer store my stuff on windows just in a USB DEVICE  u can buy on ebay i have the double one so i can either plug in 1 or 2 hdd or ssd  in it best way that way if u get a virus or pc gets messed up u dont loose anything if u have 2 reinstall or use your other 1

2483

@smoerke1  -Always include PC model and version of Windows in your posts.

Assuming I understand what you said (please, please use punctuation in your posts), you have to use F12 to select which is the boot drive when several internal drives have an OS on them. 

That's just the way it is. When Windows Boot Manager sees multiple bootable drives, it doesn't know which one you want to boot from, so it asks. If it didn't ask, and just booted from the SSD, you wouldn't ever have a chance to boot from any of those other drives.

If you want to use the hard drive that was cloned onto the SSD, just for storage now, you have to boot from the SSD and then use Disk Management to initialize the HDD (EVERYTHING will be removed!). Once that's done, the HDD won't be bootable but will be available for storage.

If you want to keep backups of the SSD, you can make images of it using Macrium Reflect (free) on a regular schedule and save those images on an external USB HDD. You can also image the internal HDD that you're only using for storage and save that image on a USB HDD too.

Ron

   Forum Member since 2004
   I'm not a Dell employee

2172

Thanks everyone for having this information here.  I found it useful in my decision to install a SSD drive (WD Black 500GB SN750 NVMe).  I have this specific computer.  First, installing the hardware.  I didn't need the standoff screw.  One was already in place but I did need the screw to secure the drive on the standoff screw.  It looks like there are no threads in the standoff screw but there is.

I planned on leaving the original drive in place in case things went wrong.  After bootup the new drive was not seen by Windows 10 in Disk Management but in the BIOS it was seen.  I was going to do a few things to try and fix this but with the second bootup Windows saw the drive. So all that was needed was to startups?   I initialized the drive and used Acronis to clone the original drive.  Upon cloning Acronis said there were partition errors.  I ran check disk and tried again.  There were no errors so I had a successful clone.

Ok, now I needed to make the new drive the boot drive.  My plan was going to disconnect the old drive and bootup and reconnect with a second bootup as suggested.  But, first I wanted to bootup to make sure the original drive was still able to bootup so it was done with both drives still connected.   Also, I noticed that after cloning the new drive wasn't seen in File Explorer.  I don't know what happened but the first bootup was done with the new drive.  I didn't try and rationalize this and just said better for me.  Also, in Disk Management the new drive is showing as the bootup drive.  In File Explorer it now shows the new drive and it is now the C drive.

And, yes, it is substantially faster now.  I hope my experience could help others in their decision. 

 

 

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you cant have two drives with the same OS in the same machine because both may be seen as "active". Your booting from the HDD is because its seen as the "active" OS and so the system boots from it. Remove the 1TB drive or simply format it once your sure the SSD loads properly.

In BIOS don't forget to commit the changes you've made as far as which disk is going to be the startup disk by hitting F10

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