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Last reply by 05-24-2022 Solved
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Dhcp question

Hello this one is confused me for many years and I've never found an answer. I have a router which gives out IP addresses I then also have have a 2012 server which also gives out IP addresses. My thinking behind this is all wireless devices so laptops mobile phones etc will pick up an IP address from the router. the server itself has a fixed 192 address. I've set the router to issue ip addresses 10 to 150  and the server 151 and above. What I find is the wired devices all get their IP addresses from the 10 to 150 range it appears 151 and above of only get issued if I switch the router off which obviously I don't want to do do. What is the correct way to configure what is effectively two DHCP servers on the same network

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Thought I'd answer my own question on this one. The answer is to put another router into the home network. As long as this is on a different subnet mask and has its one connection set to the main router I can turn off DHCP and the server takes over issuing IP address to the network.

There is an interesting video on YouTube by Peter Lloyd from memory that explains this in a lot more detail. I hope this helps somebody

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Thought I'd answer my own question on this one. The answer is to put another router into the home network. As long as this is on a different subnet mask and has its one connection set to the main router I can turn off DHCP and the server takes over issuing IP address to the network.

There is an interesting video on YouTube by Peter Lloyd from memory that explains this in a lot more detail. I hope this helps somebody

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It may be simpler to manage just to have your Windows Server DHCP give out IP addresses. 

If so just turn off the DHCP server on your router. Then any wireless device should be able to connect to your router, this connects to your LAN and to the server DHCP and so gets a IP address from that. That provides a single point of management/monitoring etc for all devices you have.

You may want to have 2 subnets & therefore 2 different DHCP servers for other reasons - such as security however.

Hi i initially tried switching the router dhcp off and the wifi devices failed to connect but not sure why. The wifi devices on the new subnet work fine though. Not sure if it was an issue with virgin needing dhcp on the router.

Trying to work out if this makes my test lab more secure. I did connect a laptop to the home wifi and it couldnt see the server

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