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Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Good morning,

 

The Recovery Drive (D) graph which indicates free space and space used, has turned from blue to red.  Also,  it shows 633 mb free of 9.99 gb. and it appears as if the drive is almost full.   (What is the difference between bites, gb and mg?)

 

Can someone explain why the sudden color change and what should be done before the drive becomes full?

 

Thank you,

 

Nissi1

 

Vista Home Premiun, SP1

3gb RAM

 

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Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Hi Nissi1

The color change you noticed is perfectly normal when the drive approaches its full capacity (in percent of total disk memory) on your Vista machine; I've got two that are both red on my machine but still have around 10GB left on each.

In order to free up some space on your drives, consider burning your media to cd's or dvd-r's; the first can hold about 800 MB of data, and the latter 4.3 GB. DVD Dual Layer discs are expensive, but can hold up to 8.5 GB (retail value must be adjusted because they count their units "conveniently" to make it appear they have more room than they actually do). You can probably find DL's at Sams Club for around $50 for a 50 case of Verbatims; that's the best deal I've found so far.

Other options are to buy an external hdd, like a Western Digital or a Seagate. These can be purchased for around $100 and can hold anywhere from 250 to 500 GB of data.

One more option, although not my favorite, is to compress (archive) your data with a program like winrar to make it take up less room; these programs use algorithms to shrink your files, although you must unpack them whenever you want to access them later on. This process can take a considerable amount of time, especially for larger files. It is the one free option I can think of at the moment, though.

Hope that helps!

-LANPartyGeek

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Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Hello Nissi1, The Restore Points are different than the Dell Recovery Restore. The Dell Recovery Restore is only used to restore your system back to the point when was shipped.

The Restore Points are "Snapshots" of the operating system at a certain point in time. These "Snapshot Restore Points" are used to restore just the operating system to a working state, when it becomes corrupted or unstable.

Most of the Programs are not affected, although sometimes, certain programs will need to be re-installed after a Restore Point is performed.

The Restore Points are created in two ways, and can consume a great deal of hard drive capacity.

You can adjust the settings to the space you want the Restore Points to consume, however, I would leave it at the default setting.

The operating system will create a restore point, usually one time each day or so and it is labeled "System Checkpoint".

There are other times the Restore Points are created, usually when new software programs and sometimes when Windows Updates are installed.

If the Restore Points are left alone, when the specified capacity has been reached, the operating system will start to remove the oldest of the Restore Points.

From time to time, I clean all the Restore Points from my system, only when I know it has been operating properly for a few days, or when I do some maintenance cleanup of the system.

You can do this by opening the System Restore Utility and uncheck the box for the C:\ drive, click "Apply", and the Restore Points will all be removed.

Then immediately "Create" a new Restore Point. You will be asked to give it a name.

I usually name it with some name that caused me to create it and put the date and time, so I know exactly why and what it was done for.

This approach will free up quite a bit of hard drive capacity.

After doing this, I usually defrag the system, and it appears to be more responsive.

Hope this helps.

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2 Bronze

Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Hi Nissi1

The color change you noticed is perfectly normal when the drive approaches its full capacity (in percent of total disk memory) on your Vista machine; I've got two that are both red on my machine but still have around 10GB left on each.

In order to free up some space on your drives, consider burning your media to cd's or dvd-r's; the first can hold about 800 MB of data, and the latter 4.3 GB. DVD Dual Layer discs are expensive, but can hold up to 8.5 GB (retail value must be adjusted because they count their units "conveniently" to make it appear they have more room than they actually do). You can probably find DL's at Sams Club for around $50 for a 50 case of Verbatims; that's the best deal I've found so far.

Other options are to buy an external hdd, like a Western Digital or a Seagate. These can be purchased for around $100 and can hold anywhere from 250 to 500 GB of data.

One more option, although not my favorite, is to compress (archive) your data with a program like winrar to make it take up less room; these programs use algorithms to shrink your files, although you must unpack them whenever you want to access them later on. This process can take a considerable amount of time, especially for larger files. It is the one free option I can think of at the moment, though.

Hope that helps!

-LANPartyGeek

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4 Tellurium

Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Hello Nissi1, The 😧 drive you refer to, is the Dell Recovery Restore partition.

The 😧 drive (partition) contains all the Dell Recovery Restore data for use if you decided to restore your system to the state as it was shipped.

It is normal for it to be almost completely full, and you should try to do nothing to change this drive or data in it, or your Dell Recovery Restore feature would not wok.

You also have 2 additional partitions on the drive that are hidden, but can be seen from within the Control Panel, Administrative Tools, Computer Management, Storage, Disk Management.

Without getting too technical, data is written in bits, bytes, kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes, terabytes.

These are just numbers to allow users to see what size data is on their systems.

Most users will only deal with megabytes (MB) and gigabytes (GB).

Just think of them as one, eight, hundreds, millions, billions, trillions.

I suppose I should mention that while your hard drive may be advertised as, for example a 500 GB capacity, it will only show in the Windows operating systems as around 465 GB, due to the way Windows calculates the data and format considerations. 

Hope this helps.

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3 Cadmium

Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Good afternoon,

 

Thank you LANPartyGeek and Hanspuppa,

 

I now remember reading an article that said the Recovery Drive can become full with restore points of backed-up data.  It also suggested deletion of the older restore points when the drive becomes full, to make room for the newer points.  However it has now been suggested this should not be done.

 

My 20 month old computer only contains emails, pictures, which are precious to me, bookmarks and feeds.  What will happen when the drive becomes full?  Will the computer be unable to create new restore points?  Will I be unable to backup new information?  Will the computer rid itself of the older restore points to make room for the newer ones?

 

Thank you LANPartyGeek for the information on external drives. 

 

Thank you Hanspuppa for explaining bits, bytes, kilobytes, megabytes, gigabytes and terabytes.

 

Continued blessings,

 

Nissi1

 

 

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4 Tellurium

Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Hello Nissi1, The Restore Points are different than the Dell Recovery Restore. The Dell Recovery Restore is only used to restore your system back to the point when was shipped.

The Restore Points are "Snapshots" of the operating system at a certain point in time. These "Snapshot Restore Points" are used to restore just the operating system to a working state, when it becomes corrupted or unstable.

Most of the Programs are not affected, although sometimes, certain programs will need to be re-installed after a Restore Point is performed.

The Restore Points are created in two ways, and can consume a great deal of hard drive capacity.

You can adjust the settings to the space you want the Restore Points to consume, however, I would leave it at the default setting.

The operating system will create a restore point, usually one time each day or so and it is labeled "System Checkpoint".

There are other times the Restore Points are created, usually when new software programs and sometimes when Windows Updates are installed.

If the Restore Points are left alone, when the specified capacity has been reached, the operating system will start to remove the oldest of the Restore Points.

From time to time, I clean all the Restore Points from my system, only when I know it has been operating properly for a few days, or when I do some maintenance cleanup of the system.

You can do this by opening the System Restore Utility and uncheck the box for the C:\ drive, click "Apply", and the Restore Points will all be removed.

Then immediately "Create" a new Restore Point. You will be asked to give it a name.

I usually name it with some name that caused me to create it and put the date and time, so I know exactly why and what it was done for.

This approach will free up quite a bit of hard drive capacity.

After doing this, I usually defrag the system, and it appears to be more responsive.

Hope this helps.

View solution in original post

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2 Bronze

Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Hello Hanspuppa,

 

Thank you for all the information.  I will clean all the Restore Point.

 

BTW, my name may have changed for this post.  I spent the last 3 days attempting to re-enter my account, it was a mess.  But I will start a new thread for that.

 

A blessed and safe holiday I wish for you and your family.

 

Nissi1

 

I forgot to mention how adorable the dogs are.

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Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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I will clean all the Restore Point. I forgot to mention how adorable the dogs are.

Please update us on your success or lack therof, as it may be useful for others with the same issue.

Thanks for your comment about Hans, the Miniature Schnauzer, better known as Hanspuppa.

We just got back from the vet and he has to have a little surgery on Monday. Nothing serious.

He's 11 years old and like me, getting on up there, but we both are still barking, albiet softly.

Thanks again...

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Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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When wisdom comes with age, you no longer have to bark loudly.  It teaches speaking softly or in come cases not at all speaks the loudest.

 

Hanspuppa is adorable.  Thank you for sharing that bit of information. 

 

As you mentioned in your earlier post, I also will wait a few more days to ensure as best as one can, all is well with my computer before I clean up all the restore points.  At this time there is havoc between this forum and my computer.  Along with everything else, after your last post I received 3 email notices: an email notifying me of my post; an email notifying me of your previous post; and an email notifying me of your last post.  But I will certainly post back after the cleanup with my experience.

 

Continued grace to you and all your loved ones,

 

Nissi1

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4 Tellurium

Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Hello  nissi2, I also, have had so  much trouble with the email responses, I had to turn it off in my profile.

That makes it a little difficult to try and remember what I have posted and what I haven't.

Maybe soon, this will all get straightened out.

I hope so.

Thanks Again...

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Re: Picture of Recovery Drive has turned Red

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Good evening Hanspuppa,

 

How is Hanspuppa?   As promised, I am writing to share my experience of how I cleaned up space in my D drive which was becoming full with Restore Points.

 

As you suggested, first I waited a few days to ensure, as best I could, that my system was operating properly.  Along with my resident security system, I ran scans with Malwarebytes and SuperAntiSpyware to rid any malwares that may be present.  I also ran CCleaners to clean out temporary files, cookies, etc.  Then, as you suggested, I opened the Backup and Restore System, clicked Create A Restore Point or Change Settings, click System Protection and unchecked the D drive.  Of course I received a warning, but I continued.  It only took a few seconds before it was complete.  When I checked the D drive (start, computer), the color had returned to blue.

 

As a side note, I expected the bar to move further back than it did, however, it was evident free space was obtained by the numbers beneath.  They now read:  1.27 gb free as oppose to 633 mg.  Finally, I defraged.  Within a few minutes, I was notified: Defragment Not Necessary.  Your File System Performance is Good.

 

I must report a hickup in this little scenario.  I made the mistake and unchecked the C drive at first!  Yikes!  (Normally I would use one of the Smileys here, but I have already lost the first post I attempted to type by doing that!!!!!!)  I really thought I had wiped out my entire C drive, Oh My Gosh! Next to C drive was the word None!   When I checked my files there were there.  Yeah!  I rechecked the C drive, clicked Apply and today's date appeared.  I am not sure what I did but I know I did not lose any programs or files, I hope.

 

That was the end to my first experience with clearing up space on the Recovery (D) drive.

 

Again thank you for your support.  In the event you respond to this post, I will be taking a break from this forum for a couple of days.  I will certainly respond when I return.  And please forgive the typos.  I have found that I can lose a post just by attempting to edit them.

 

Hope everything is well with Hanspuppa,

 

Nissi1&2