Storage, Drives & Media

2 Bronze

SSD Not booting

Hello:

I have
installed a new Samsung SSD 840 Pro and can not get it to boot on startup. I
cloned the drive with the Samsung Migration software without any problem. I changed
the setup to boot first from the SSD and then the old HDD. It passes the SSD
and boots from the old hDD everytime even though I have made every change that
I could see without any success. The SSD seems to be recognized in device
manager and the software was automatically downloaded after the first startup. Ideas
and advice would be greatly appreciated.

Will

Studio XPS 8100,
i-7, Win7

Solutions (4)

Accepted Solutions
Moderator
Moderator

Hi Will,

I appreciate the time and effort that you took to troubleshoot the issue. It seems windows image you have on the SSD is corrupt.

It would be better if take an backup from the hard-drive,restore it to SSD and then check again.

You can also manually install windows on SSD to confirm its functionality.

If you have any further queries, please feel free to contact us.

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

 

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

To know more about Dell Product Support, Drivers & Downloads, Order & Dispatch status -> choose your region US Customers; UK Customers; India Customers. For Dell support videos click Here.

View solution in original post

Community Accepted Solution
3 Zinc

Have a look at this post and follow the two links i provided. These links will give you more of an idea how best to migrate a HDD to the SSD using windows only applications.

In any case, the tool you used may have missed cloning the100MB or 200MB or 2GB System boot partition that normally is created with Windows 7.Here is my SSD (Disk 0) which has the OS installed as seen from Disk Manager

View solution in original post

Community Accepted Solution
3 Zinc

Willdloy, while i'm not familiar with your XPS 8100 it's likely you have an Intel chipset supporting RAID and your BIOS settings allow for either ATA or RAID configuration. What this means is that the chipset will be presented to the OS either as devices under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" or as device under "Storage controllers" within the device manager itself.

Now when in ATA mode, this means that your HDD will be shown as connected to the IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller within the device manager and the device will use the "atapi.sys" driver which is not ideal for SSD's as TRIM is not passed with this driver.

When in RAID mode, this means that your HDD will be shown as connected to the Storage Controller (in my case Intel Desktop/Workstation/Server Chipset SATA RAID Controller) within the device manager and will use the "iaStorA.sys" driver which (like "msahci.sys") will support SSD and their TRIM functionality while also supporting RAID 0 connection.

You can see where your HDD/SSD is actually connected using the device manager and setting the "view" to "device by connection". Hereis what mine looks like.

As you can see, my Intel SSD is listed as "ATA Intel SSDSC2CW12 SCSI Disk device" while my 2x HDD in RAID 1 is listed as "Intel Raid 1 Volume SCSI Disk Device". The friendly name shown for the SSD/HDD/ODD includes "SCSI disk device" which is due to the version of Intel RST drivers that i am using, it seems that pre version 11.4 the friendly name was a little more logical and didn't reference ATA or SCSI in the string. It's nothing to worry about though.

So there is no fault or issue to worry about by not having AHCI setting in BIOS and really you don't need to force any driver to be used via registry settings as some seem to like to do. Keep it simple is best. Also, no need to buy a SATA3 card as you wont likely see much of a boost from the on-board SATA2 (3gb/s) interface in normal use... And adding a SATA3 PCIe card will not magically make an AHCI setting appear in BIOS...

View solution in original post

Community Accepted Solution
Moderator
Moderator

Hi Will,

Its great to hear that system is booting from SSD now. And boot time for the system has been improved significantly. You may upgrade to Sata 3 with your convenience.

If you have any further queries, please feel free to contact us.

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

To know more about Dell Product Support, Drivers & Downloads, Order & Dispatch status -> choose your region US Customers; UK Customers; India Customers. For Dell support videos click Here.

View solution in original post

Community Accepted Solution
Replies (14)
Moderator
Moderator

Hi willdloy,

Kindly try to boot the system by pressing F12 key at the start up to and selecting SSD on one time boot menu. Also, disable the internal HDD and then try to boot with the SSD only.

Then, let us know if you receive any error message. Please perform these steps and let us know the results, so we can advise you further.

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

To know more about Dell Product Support, Drivers & Downloads, Order & Dispatch status -> choose your region US Customers; UK Customers; India Customers. For Dell support videos click Here.

2 Bronze

Hello:

I did as you instructed and here are the results:

F12 at start – selected SSD as boot device Result received message “BOOTMGR is missing”

After disabling the HDD result - “BOOTMGR is missing”

I hooked the HDD back up selected it as boot and it then booted as normal.

Will

Moderator
Moderator

Hi Will,

I appreciate the time and effort that you took to troubleshoot the issue. It seems windows image you have on the SSD is corrupt.

It would be better if take an backup from the hard-drive,restore it to SSD and then check again.

You can also manually install windows on SSD to confirm its functionality.

If you have any further queries, please feel free to contact us.

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

 

Thanks and Regards
Sandeep P
#iworkfordell

To know more about Dell Product Support, Drivers & Downloads, Order & Dispatch status -> choose your region US Customers; UK Customers; India Customers. For Dell support videos click Here.

Community Accepted Solution

Hello Sandeep, i have replaced my Laptop with an SSD and downloaded the recovery media from Dell and placed this onto a botable USB.

 

I complete the installation and windows loads fine and after the 1st reboot, the DELL logo with the spinning wheel appears, and does not load the OS.

 

I have had a look at your above post and checked the Secure boot options as is.

 

Nothing works for me at the moment.

#desperate

3 Zinc

Have a look at this post and follow the two links i provided. These links will give you more of an idea how best to migrate a HDD to the SSD using windows only applications.

In any case, the tool you used may have missed cloning the100MB or 200MB or 2GB System boot partition that normally is created with Windows 7.Here is my SSD (Disk 0) which has the OS installed as seen from Disk Manager

Community Accepted Solution

Thanks for the assistance.  I have the Poweredge T320.  I used the Todo backup tool. Here is the link : https://www.easeus.com/backup-software/tb-server.html The clone trial feature is good for 30 days.  I also had to remove the original raid drives temporarily.  This caused the windows 2012 to go into repair mode and then rebooted cleanly.  I then re added the original raid drives later.  Voila!!!  The performance boost is incredible!

 

 

 

 

 

2 Bronze

Thank you both for your replies. It seems that you both were right as I recloned the drive and it booted up as it should have. The only problem is that I do not have the option in the settings to use AHCI instead of raid. I tried setting to ATA and it would not boot. If I install a SATA 3 card will that give me to AHCI option in settings which is recommended?

Any way I am now booting in 35 second instead of 2 mins and 35 seconds as before. I am quite happy with the speed of the computer but may get a new SATA3 card if I can find one that is inexpensive and recommended.

Thanks for your help.

Will

For my dell latitude e6530, my win 10 hdd died and I was not able to clone due to 270 bad sectors. No easeus programs were useful. 

So I had my dell computer with no working hard drive to boot from, and my ssd, although perfectly formatted on another computer via usb sata using disk management, it was not being seen at all when trying to install windows 7 or 10 with disk or iso boot usb.

This is my solve:

I found the problem.

Please advise computer users to update their bios, before their old hardrive dies! This is the main issue.

Reflashing my bios without a hard drive was next to impossible but with 5 days work with no sleep and 1000 restarts, I finally hacked my bios via dddpm boot usb by dropping the new downloaded bios exe directly into the dddpm boot files. "Dell diagnostic deployment package" follow instructions to create bootable usb using this program. 

See instructions:

https://www.dell.com/support/article/en-ca/sln143196/how-to-create-a-bootable-usb-flash-drive-using-...

This was a serious pain in the bum as some of the steps were obviously omitted. Nobody on the entire internet had this solve for my dell. I manually accomplished this through a weeks worth of trial and error.

This is the solve for future dell complaints.

Bios update to version a22 or a24 for dell latitude notebooks (specific bios update for machine from dell website). Place downloaded bios exe on desktop after downloading it from dell website and keep it handy. This was my version! Use the dell drivers and downloads webpage to find the specific and newest ones for your machine!

Create bootable usb using the "dddpm" dell download tool but dont hit execute yet (dont actually create the boot usb yet). Add the exe bios file into the dddpm files on the dddpm partition on the usb. Follow dells instructions and delete unnecessary dddpm files as shown. Then now finally hit execute.

Now the new bootable usb has the new bios in program and booting it can finally read it.

Using ufei or legacy boot to usb from bios:

Command prompt should come up if you deleted the diagostic files as suggested in dell instructions.

Enter exact name of exe file into prompt. Eg "123455a22.exe"

Hit enter.

*must have >10% battery and functioning adapter. This was another issue I ran into because my adapter is only suppliying run power and it is not charging batteries. I had to switch batteries to get bios update to run.

So I had these main issues that prevented easy switch to ssd

1). Bios wasnt updated
2). No working harddrive to update bios easily.

3) Dddpm instructions did not specific WHERE to put bios file. (It must be dropped into the correct partition of usb so it is visible via adding it to the file dddpm file cluster before creating the bootable usb in dddpm.) 
3). Bad adapter and low battery warning.


These are the solves for my specific case with dell latitude e6530 with old bios and no bootable hard drive.

Now everyone knows.

I should also mention that older laptops need to manually run factory image disks with win 7 first on new ssd in order to upgrade via windows media creation tool later unless they just buy new license.

I would imagine that most people run into bios issues and this should always be the first go to solve for older computers.

Thanks everyone and I hope this info helps the next person. Paying it forward. 

 

Download and upgrade while you can folks. 

 

3 Zinc

Willdloy, while i'm not familiar with your XPS 8100 it's likely you have an Intel chipset supporting RAID and your BIOS settings allow for either ATA or RAID configuration. What this means is that the chipset will be presented to the OS either as devices under "IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers" or as device under "Storage controllers" within the device manager itself.

Now when in ATA mode, this means that your HDD will be shown as connected to the IDE ATA/ATAPI Controller within the device manager and the device will use the "atapi.sys" driver which is not ideal for SSD's as TRIM is not passed with this driver.

When in RAID mode, this means that your HDD will be shown as connected to the Storage Controller (in my case Intel Desktop/Workstation/Server Chipset SATA RAID Controller) within the device manager and will use the "iaStorA.sys" driver which (like "msahci.sys") will support SSD and their TRIM functionality while also supporting RAID 0 connection.

You can see where your HDD/SSD is actually connected using the device manager and setting the "view" to "device by connection". Hereis what mine looks like.

As you can see, my Intel SSD is listed as "ATA Intel SSDSC2CW12 SCSI Disk device" while my 2x HDD in RAID 1 is listed as "Intel Raid 1 Volume SCSI Disk Device". The friendly name shown for the SSD/HDD/ODD includes "SCSI disk device" which is due to the version of Intel RST drivers that i am using, it seems that pre version 11.4 the friendly name was a little more logical and didn't reference ATA or SCSI in the string. It's nothing to worry about though.

So there is no fault or issue to worry about by not having AHCI setting in BIOS and really you don't need to force any driver to be used via registry settings as some seem to like to do. Keep it simple is best. Also, no need to buy a SATA3 card as you wont likely see much of a boost from the on-board SATA2 (3gb/s) interface in normal use... And adding a SATA3 PCIe card will not magically make an AHCI setting appear in BIOS...

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