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2 Jasper
2 Jasper
268225

BIOS Setting to boot USB UEFI stick

Hello !

I own this, new to me, G3-15 (3579).

It cam with Linux installed on the M.2 NVME card (Ubuntu 16.04). I want to test Ubuntu 18.04 on the virgin HDD.

SO I'm trying to boot an UEFI USB stick with a live 18.04 OS on it.

I'm unable to find the setting(s) to make this USB stick to boot and work.  I've even tried to upgrade the BIOS to the latest 1.5.1 version to no avail.

Could you please tell me what I do wrong and/or link me to a detailed BIOS user guide for DEll platforms ?

Many thanks in advance for your help and answer.

Have a bright day.

Solution (1)

Accepted Solutions
263214

Hello !

After some fiddling with USB sticks and settings, I finally found the answer. I did "pure" USB stcks, I.E. with GPT partition tables and EFI boot executable.

I is not working. But when you partition your stick with MSDOS (or MBR as it is sometimes called) the stick is detected and if the boot is set to UEFI on the stick, it is listed on the UEFI boot list.

So I've found the "workaround" or the logic behind the Dell boot BIOS.

Thanks for your help.

Have a nice day.

 

Need further assistance? Use the "Get Help Now" option at the bottom right to chat with a Dell technician right away. 

DellRamanS_0-1648151749162.png


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Replies (10)
263129

Hello,

Connect the stick to usb port and reboot the system (or turn it on) as soon as you see the Dell logo tap F12 in the menu that appaers choose your stick.

7 Plutonium
263128

The answer above is correct. On UEFI systems, the boot order list for local storage devices only includes paths that have been formally registered into the firmware, which is typically done during OS installation. Temporarily attached devices like flash drives are accessed through the F12 one-time boot menu. Technically you could register the \EFI\Boot\Bootx64.efi bootloader file on that flash drive as a permanent boot device, but you may not want to.


263122

Thank you both for your answer, but, unfortunately it does not work. I tried with 2 different USB sticks : one old 8GB USB2.0 GPT formatted with Ubuntu 18.10 put on it in "copy mode" by the Rufus application one Lexar USB 3.0 32GB with the same parameters and done exactly as the previous one. None show whatever options I choose. in F12 or in the BIOS ! So all help will be greatly appreciated !
263113

If you haven’t already, try other USB ports on the system. I’ve noticed that some newer Dell systems only allow booting from certain ports for some reason. You also have to make sure the flash drive is already connected when the system first powers up. You can’t connect it afterward, just in case you were doing that.


263215

Hello !

After some fiddling with USB sticks and settings, I finally found the answer. I did "pure" USB stcks, I.E. with GPT partition tables and EFI boot executable.

I is not working. But when you partition your stick with MSDOS (or MBR as it is sometimes called) the stick is detected and if the boot is set to UEFI on the stick, it is listed on the UEFI boot list.

So I've found the "workaround" or the logic behind the Dell boot BIOS.

Thanks for your help.

Have a nice day.

 

Need further assistance? Use the "Get Help Now" option at the bottom right to chat with a Dell technician right away. 

DellRamanS_0-1648151749162.png


Helpful Videos:

 

263067

FYI MSDOS and MBR are not interchangeable terms at all. MBR has nothing to do with DOS. But yes, a UEFI system can boot in UEFI mode from either GPT or MBR USB devices as long as the partition is formatted FAT32 and the UEFI bootloader file is there. GPT is more common, but MBR does work, and can be useful if you want to make a single USB device that’s bootable for both Legacy BIOS and UEFI systems. Glad you found a workaround.


71651

Many thanks jphughan for pointing the path \EFI\Boot\Bootx64.efi of the bootloader file in Windows 10 64 bits USB Media creator tool ! It was missing in following Dell support article https://www.dell.com/support/article/fr/fr/frdhs1/sln142679/how-to-enable-boot-from-dvd-option-with-... and I was able to boot from USB stick with UEFI boot mode enabled by adding it in BIOS UEFI File Name entry which has not to be left blank ;-)
253826

In order to get UEFI to work you can't use GPT - you must use fat32 during creation of the bootable usb.  Use diskpart to clean, partition, and format the stick using fat32 as the filesystem. Span the .wim's if they are too large.  I believe that GPT used to work but recent firmware updates changed this - I'm not certain.  What I can say is that I had a bootable uefi system that was GPT in order to support large files but this no longer enumerates on Dell systems -  However, it still works on HP's.  I suspect a BIOS update or an Intel firmware update made this change - and for the worse.

253819

@m0dul8r  GPT is a partition layout scheme for the entire disk (the other option is MBR), whereas FAT32 is a file system for a partition (other options include NTFS, exFAT, etc.)  You can have a GPT flash drive that uses a FAT32 partition or an MBR flash drive that uses a FAT32 partition.  GPT and FAT32 aren't "opposite".  And you can absolutely use a GPT-initialized disk to boot in UEFI mode from USB devices.  I do it all the time, and in fact UEFI is explicitly intended to boot from GPT devices.  It also supports booting from MBR-initialized devices for backward compatibility, but it's fine with GPT.

Spanning WIMs can be a problem because the Windows Setup interface won't allow you to select images that reside in a spanned WIM, so if you use a spanned WIM you'd need to apply the image to the disk manually using a tool like DISM -- but most people don't know how to do that.  If I have a WIM that's larger than 4GB, I use Rufus to create a specially prepared flash drive that uses an NTFS partition for the main data but also contains a small FAT partition that stores a UEFI NTFS driver.  That way, when I boot the system in UEFI mode, it initially boots from the FAT partition, loads the UEFI NTFS driver, and then turns around and boots from whatever is on the NTFS partition.  It works brilliantly.  The only catch is that you have to disable Secure Boot because the bootloader for the NTFS driver is provided under an open source license and Microsoft therefore won't sign the bootloader so that it's trusted under Secure Boot.  But you can re-enable Secure Boot after you've installed whatever OS you're installing.


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